Where People & Piggies Thrive

Newbie or Guinea Guru? Popcorn in!

Register for free to enjoy the full benefits.
Find out more about the NEW, drastically improved site and forum!

Register

Animal Welfare What is involved in starting a rescue?

RRDominick

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Posts
108
Joined
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
108
I wasn't sure where to post this. I was wondering what all is involved in starting and maintaining a rescue. There aren't any around my area(at least for small animals), and I think this is an excuse many people use to justify buying a pet from a pet store. I know this isn't something that should be taken lightly, but I wanted to do some research and thought I could get some good advice here. I know that supplies and food and bedding are very important and can get expensive, also vet care for animals that some in. How do rescues afford all that stuff? I've been thinking about this for a a little bit, not long but I wanted to get some thoughts from other members. Thanks guys.
 

Jennicat

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Posts
1,426
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
1,426
It's difficult to afford all that stuff, you're right. Our rescue has 4-5 heavily involved members that end up contributing a ton of money to covering vet bills and supplies. We get donations (we're a 501(c)3) but they're not nearly enough to cover expenditures, especially vet bills, which are often the most expensive.

I would say that if you wanted to start a rescue, your best bet is to find the next closest rescue, and ask for help. Rescuing animals is complicated. Well, not the actual rescuing, you'll find that part is going to be the easiest, but finding adopters, screening them successfully, putting animals into homes that are forever homes, and education are often the toughest. I was lucky enough to join a rescue that was already in existence, and these things are very tough for us, even with years and years of experience combined.

A bad rescue can do more damage to public opinion than just about anything else. There are several "small animal" rescues here, where people basically decided that they liked bunnies or gerbils or whatever, and have started rescuing them. Because they're not educated about the species they're rescuing, their animals are often ill but they don't know it. Their screening process is not very strenuous because they're "just rodents", so we end up with a lot of their animals flooding in to us! Taking an animal from one bad home and putting it into another bad home is not rescuing the animal (in my opinion), it's simply shuffling around the suffering.
 

YayPiggies

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Posts
447
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
447
You also need to contact shelters in your area and the general public so you can take care of those pigs when the people can't. If nobody knows about it you won't get any pigs.
 

ferndalezoo

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Posts
887
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
887
Is there a local trustworthy non-breed specific dog-and-cat rescue with which you could allign yourself? Rather than re-inventing the wheel and starting something totally new?
 

sdpiggylvr

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Sep 14, 2009
Posts
1,791
Joined
Sep 14, 2009
Messages
1,791
Starting a rescue is a big challenge - just as Teresa (CavySpirit). You'd want to ask her about her experiences, but I'm sure she'd say that it isn't easy at all.

Guinea pigs are great pets, and I think it'd be great if you COULD start a rescue, but you have to understand that it's very expensive to run a rescue - vet bills, especially. You might want to start saving for a "vet fund."

I'd say to first make a plan. How many animals will you budget to rescue and adopt out? How much will those animals cost? Do you have the space/cages?

Next, think of some ways you can cut costs. Can you buy from a local hay place? Can you buy pellets in bulk? Is there a local farmer’s market that has good veggies for a good price? Figure out how you’ll save money to care for these animals.

Then, build yourself a reputation. Talk to other rescues and shelters in the area and explain to them how you’re starting a rescue. Tell them that you’d love to correspond with them, share ideas and info, and are willing to take extra animals that they don’t have room for.

Now to paperwork—you’ll need to create a professional-looking adoption form packet. Figure out what information you’ll need to place the animal in a good home. Plan to educate all adopters about each animal’s care. Create some care guides or brochures to hand out to the public or adopters. A business card would also be a good idea.

What about publicity? How will you get the word out to everyone that you have adoptable animals? Perhaps you could work with a pet store and have an adoption day on their property. Or maybe you could put up signs, create a website, or other advertising methods.

The day-to-day care is going to be a challenge if you have to do it alone. You might want to get some volunteers to help with the care and adoption events. (If you have them.) I recommend making a website and having a phone number inquirers can call. On the website, you should have pictures and description of each adoptable animal, a page about the rescue, a wish list, a donations page, and a contact us page. More would be great, but this is probably the bare minimum.

These are just a few of the things you’ll need to consider before starting a rescue.

You might consider joining the Social Group called “RESCUES” here in the GPC forum. There are lot of members who run rescues, and may be able to assist you and provide more information.

Good luck!
 
Last edited:
Status
This thread has been closed due to inactivity. You can create a new thread to discuss this topic.

Similar threads

Top