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Breeding The Real Numbers for Breeding Guinea Pigs

jowasaurus

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
276
I've really been thinking about whether or not to post this story just because the guinea pigs I will be discussing aren't my own.
I could probably go into more detail, but I will spare you all the drawn-out version with just the basics of what has been happening around me the last few weeks in the guinea pig world.

First, the ARL recently had a box of 2-3 week old guinea pigs dropped off on their front door. Inside this cardboard box with the four very small guinea pigs was their dead mother. The mother guinea pig had died from complications from birth but was left with the young ones in the hopes that her dead body would still provide the young ones with milk. [Can people get more disgusting? Instead of taking these pigs to get proper care, they were thrown out because uneducated -probably- adults let their guinea pig get pregnant. --The babies are now doing fine, but that's not the point.]


Second, four pregnant guinea pigs were dropped off at some of the local rescues. Two came in together and the other two had separate "owners".

-One of the mothers had the beautiful births that everyone wants to see. Her pelvis separates fine, the baby comes out, she cares for it, etc.

-The second mother separated okay but had difficulty pushing the second baby out and needed the baby to be pulled out. Both mother and 3 baby are doing fine, though the baby has a little bit of an elongated body [It's still cute]

-The third and fourth mother aren't doing nearly as well. The third mother. . . is probably about 3-4 months old. She is WAY to young to be pregnant. She was relinquished with her owners knowing the date she was impregnated and she was a few days past her expected delivery date. She had not separated far enough for anyone to come out and needed a C-section from our amazing cavy vet. During the 3 hour long procedure, 2 of the babies did not make it. The mother pig was brought out and is now doing well. The other 2 babies [That's right! A 3-4 month old guinea pig had FOUR babies growing inside her.] didn't make it through the night. My friend was up every 45 minutes to feed them and keep them warm but they both slowly passed away. As of now, the third mother is doing fine.

-The fourth mother passed away giving birth to her one baby. She just wasn't strong enough to save herself after pushing the baby. She hasn't separated enough to do it safely.

The third mother at the rescue was put with the mother of the 3 babies and the baby of the fourth was placed with them too in the hopes the 3rd mother would be aunty/ surrogate mother if needed since her body is producing milk at the moment.

I'm sorry if this post upsets anyone, but that is:

--5 guinea pig mothers under one year old. . . 2 of which didn't make it.
--13 baby guinea pigs. . . 4 of which didn't make it.

All of this upsets me SO much and I'm told it is almost always like this around this time of year. People get Easter and spring pets and they breed and then they get dropped off when the kids get bored with them. [Yes, that starts another topic, but they can go hand-in-hand].
And there's been people coming on this site telling us how they bred their guinea pigs or were about to and didn't know it wasn't a good idea. Well here are some real numbers. EXPERIENCED guinea pig people were with these four mothers at the rescue and saved those that could be saved. If these pigs were in the hands of someone with any less knowledge, I fear the number of those living compared to those who have passed would be even higher. I just wanted to share this since I've seen a few people asking where the 25% of deaths number came from. I think it hits the nail on the head or at least gets pretty darn close. :guilty:
 
What an amazing yet awful story, It makes me want to go into the garden and hug each of my piggies and tell them how much they are loved....
 
Yeah, but then breeders would argue that these guinea pigs weren't bred correctly in the first place, which is why so many died.

I'd want to see the numbers of small animals that get put to sleep in kill shelters. That's probably nauseating as well.
 
I'd want to see the numbers of small animals that get put to sleep in kill shelters. That's probably nauseating as well.
I found the small animal stats for a shelter here in Central FL. It didn't break them down by type so I don't know how many were piggies, bunnies, etc., but it made me want to cry. I'm so glad Borat was in a low-kill shelter because the poor baby was there for over two months. It tears out my heart to imagine him being destroyed for lack of a home, but I'm sure many of the other piggies who meet that fate are just as laid-back and sweet. Every breeder should be required to spend one day in a shelter kill room for every baby they bring into the world.
 
Yeah, but then breeders would argue that these guinea pigs weren't bred correctly in the first place, which is why so many died.

I'd want to see the numbers of small animals that get put to sleep in kill shelters. That's probably nauseating as well.

Those who BUY from breeders might breed them, resulting in more deaths. Most reputable rescues require those who ADOPT to sign a contract stating that their guinea pigs will not be bred.
 
Yeah, but then breeders would argue that these guinea pigs weren't bred correctly in the first place, which is why so many died.

Very true. I doubt people who considers themselves reputable would ever breed such young females in the first place. And I never thought these were breeders, just the accidental pregnancies from uneducated, hopefully first-and-last-time, guinea pig parents.

The humane society approximates about 50% of the 6-8 million dogs and cats that enter kill shelters are euthanized. I would believe it's a good bet that a much higher percentage of small animals are put to sleep. And a big reason is education level and [I can't think of the word]-advertising of the small animals in shelters.

I love this site for this reason alone: The education I have gained since being here and the courage those here have given me to speak up and speak out for these animals I love so much.


And I have made a personal choice that if I am abe to[funds and space wise], I will be fostering guinea pigs rather than just taking a few in here and there. I have 6 of my own at this point and have saved 4 of them. When I am in a more stable position in my life, it will be my turn to help the few local rescues here. Even when I get hay, pellets and coroplast from my friends rescue, I always try to give her a few extra dollars. She asks for $10 for a bale of hay, I give her $15. She asks for $15 for coroplast, I give her $25 when I can. It'll never be enough. . . But it's my part.
 
Most reputable rescues require those who ADOPT to sign a contract stating that their guinea pigs will not be bred.

And along with that, at the rescue closest to Pittsburgh, she stays in contact as much as she can with adopters. [You should see her email contact list and just the sheer number of guinea pig people who text her weekly] and that if anything were to come up and adopters can not take care of the guinea pig anymore that they are required contractually to bring them back to her. She is THAT committed to each pigs health and safety.
 
The humane society approximates about 50% of the 6-8 million dogs and cats that enter kill shelters are euthanized. I would believe it's a good bet that a much higher percentage of small animals are put to sleep. And a big reason is education level and [I can't think of the word]-advertising of the small animals in shelters.
Exactly. I've been a dog and cat adoption advocate since forever and would never get those animals anywhere else, other than some strays that happened to come into my life. But with guinea pigs, I was clueless. I never saw small animals in shelters when I adopted any of cats, so I figured you just go down to the pet store to get a piggy. Alas, I paid the price for that with Mufasa's quick death, but thank goodness I found this site in time to make sure my next piggies were adopted. So many little lives could be saved if only more people knew adoption is an option for smaller critters. I'm glad this site teaches that to people like me who want to do right but don't know any better till we come here.
 
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