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Vegetables stubborn little boys...

jacqueline

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Nov 26, 2011
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843
my 2 guys are doing so fine - things are all falling into place. my "problem" is this: they HATE peppers - green, red, yellow, orange - the color doesn't matter. :yuck: i've tried cutting it fine and sprinkling it on their food for several months now. they'll eat the little bit sprinkled on their food, but absolutely refuse to eat it any other way!! and there's only so much i can sprinkle on their food.
should i be worried about whether they're getting enough vitamin C, or anything else that peppers are god for?:sorry:
 
You may just have to try some different vegetables....Mine are the same way about some things.
 
If they're not eating peppers, I'd supplement with a vitamin C tablet crushed and sprinkled on their lettuce, or dissolved in a teaspoon or two of water and syringed to them. Plain vitamin C, not a multi-vitamin tablet.
 
I second supplementing with vitamin C, Oxbow carries a chewable tablet that was a big hit with one of my girls when she was sick. 50mg stabilized Vitamin C in each making it easy to feed an appropriate amount.
Oxbow Animal Health | Daily C
 
High in Vitamin C: Yellow snap beans, broccoli (watch for gas), brussels sprouts, red or green cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kiwi, honey dew melon, apricots, orange, papaya, potato, radishes, rutabagas, spinach, sweet potato, watermelon.
 
High in Vitamin C: Yellow snap beans, broccoli (watch for gas), brussels sprouts, red or green cabbage, cauliflower, collard greens, kiwi, honey dew melon, apricots, orange, papaya, potato, radishes, rutabagas, spinach, sweet potato, watermelon.

But none of those are appropriate to feed daily. This is why bell peppers are such an important part of the daily staples & guaranteed vitamin C intake. Fruits are a treat only, melons contain far too much water to feed in a needed amount, same with sweet potato that should only be fed in a tiny amount very rarely - if ever. Radishes & & spinach contain high levels of oxalates. Cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts & broccoli can all cause gas.
 
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You also have to watch for gas with cabbage, cauliflower, and collard greens. Potato is not recommended for guinea pigs at all. Spinach and sweet potato are too high in vitamin A and oxalates to be fed in sufficient quantities to supply vitamin C. I don't see rutabagas on the list, but they're very similar to turnips, so I assume they're also too high in A and oxalates. The rest on that list, except for yellow beans, are fruits, which are occasional treats only. My grocery stores don't carry yellow string beans.
 
Still learning. Daisy doesn't get gas from the spinach, which is most of what she gets her Vitamin C from. I'll be amending her diet. I also checked out the pellets I've been feeding-I thought they were a good brand, turns out they are alfalfa! Jeez Louise! They are going outside for the squirrels. Thanks everyone for the education! I'll be a better mommy now....I'm grateful to all.
 
I'm glad she doesn't get gas from spinach, but it's still too high in oxalates and vitamin A to be fed regularly. Pigs can get oxalate stones as well, so it would be a good thing to switch her to red or green leaf lettuce.
 
Thanks, BPatters! I currently buy 1 lb of organic baby spring mix from Sams Club, and that's her salad mix-seems to have a nice variety in there, and at a good price. Rutabagas are called Wax Turnips, too, but they are out of here with the pellets...
 
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