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Slate Magazine article: No Pet For You

Cavalicious

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Jan 11, 2012
Messages
140
Oh boy. My husband brought my attention to this article. The final two paragraphs are an anecdote about guinea pig adoption:

No Pet For You

I don't agree with the family of the girl who wanted a particular guinea pig. And I take issue with anyone who belittles adults who want them as pets. That said, there's a lot of extreme anecdotal examples in the article, taking both sides (Don't kill the messenger, me!). For the record, I am pro-rescue, pro-animal, anti-breeder, anti-petstore selling of animals.

Do rescue groups attend a rescuer's convention? I'd love to know what the community thinks of some of the differing ranges of philosophy.
 
I had to jump through tons of hoops to get my greyhounds. They did TWO home visits and a lengthy phone interview. The woman on the phone interview as going on and on about how whenever I'm not home, the dogs should be muzzled. Yes, sure, I'll do that so that they can rub against everything and ruin my walls/floor while I'm at work for 8+ hrs.

When I tried to get a guinea pig from the county shelter, they wanted a notarized letter from my landlord and condo association that I'm allowed to have pets. Most landlords would laugh if you asked for permission to have cavies, let alone a notarized letter. I think they use the same procedures for pigs as they do cats. I ended up coming back another day with my boyfriend, and using his address instead (he owns his place, and they check property records.)
 
When embarking on becoming an potential adoptive pet owner, the best rule of thumb I went with was to never take any aspect of the process personally. I had to remember that these people don't know me from Eve and the more defensive I appeared, the more they would think I have something to hide, which I don't. I was very conscientious and even though I have a nine year old, I never had the attitude that the GPs would be his pets. I was always going to be the primarey caregiver because the animals' welfare was far more important than giving my kid a teaching tool, or to satisfy a whim.

Anyway, I have to go on an outing. I'm curious to see what others think and I'll probably write more when I get back.
 
we had the same problem, When are dog kinda passed away due to old age we wanted to get a friend for are other 6 year old lab. We went to are local humain sosity after looking at there site for days. we only looked at dogs over the age 5, 40 pounds or less, and that were on the "red list" (meaning death was knocking at there door by no fault of there own.). we had picked out three dogs from there site and we went in to check them out. we went to the desk to fill out paper work and we got dined because are out door cat was not up to day on her shoots... i sat in the passenger sit and had to confter my crying mother the hole way home. "you would rather kill a dog then give a home just because a out door cat doesn't have its shots.", was all she said the hole ride home. we didn't go to a breeder because my mom wanted a dog that would need a home bad.

So, a few days latter we went to a small shelter in the county next to ours. as we walked threw the rows of cages (only two where filled with dogs the rest were empty) looking at each dog disguising witch one we wanted, one stood out. A small 40 pound 1 year old mut cowering in the back of the cage. she was shaking so bad i though there was something wrong with her. We asked to see her and as she was brought back to use she had to be carried. shed crawl away from use as we tried to pet her. we knew if we didn't take her no one eals would. we went to the front desk to fill out paper work. literal the lady asked nothing and only said "Thank you sooo much for adopting her! sign hear and shes all yours!" they gave use a little care package and sent use on are way.... i will always adopt a dog from that shelter as long as i live in Ohio.
 
@nibbler100, thank you for adopting that poor little dog! we almost didn't get our Picckalo because we didn't bring a letter from our landlord (didn't know we needed one). Thank goodness the pound held off on putting him down and our landlord was terrific. I can understand some of the cautions. But it's hard when you know you can give them a good home and the alternative is for them to be killed.

But I'm happy for your pup!
 
me too, although she has proven to be a handful XD after getting her it was apparent that she had been beat badly. shes fine for the most parts know but she still cowers if you move to fast around her. this also makes it close to impossible for her to train! well im sour a expert could but im not. i have my lab rolling up and playing dead but i cant even get her to sit XD
 
I adopted a mixed chihuahua/dachshund (imagine a foot long dog with a Taco Bell face) too soon after my 15 year old miniature poodle (first family dog) died. Losing Bella was a nightmare. She'd grown up in Kentucky and the vets there never diagnosed her heart murmur until I'd moved to Los Angeles and she'd come with me. She was in an oxygen tent and everything until I had to put her to sleep. I vowed I'd never have another dog, but when I went to a Wild Oats market and they were having dogs and cats out front for adoption by a local rescue, I found Trina. She was very aggressive to men for some reason (I think she was found on the streets and had been abused by homeless men; she used to bark at any of them on her walks). But she loved me - and I was single at the time. She was practically impossible to train, but as long as the men I dated were patient, she came around.

As the years rolled on and her family grew, I now realize how much adapting she had to do. She was very gentle with my son and never bit him. But she had a tendency to want to lunge after anyone who came up to her that was a stranger. In her old age it got worse, so we tried to contact the adoption agency to get help in rehoming her, perhaps with a retiree who lived alone (that's who I thought she'd bond with since our neighborhood was too noisy and full of rowdy kids that made Trina nervous). No one every called me back, so I took it upon myself and asked my retired parents if they knew of anyone who would like a dog. We did so many home visits with one person, but we could tell the potential adopter was getting senile.

While walking her, I met a senior who seemed to 'get' Trina, fell in love with her right away (which thank Zod was mutual!). It's really tough doing this, even as an amateur.

But I had no idea that people were resorting to getting their pets from a breeder or pet shop because they were getting nowhere with rescues or shelters. That makes me sad and wonder about the future of pet stores - when and if they'll ever stop selling small animals. What I don't approve of personally is satisfying every whim of a child. The kid in the article sees the online picture of the GP they want and have their heart set on it to the point where they drive the adoption - that's never a good idea. In that case, I'm glad the rescue person denies the adoption.

I know I'm rambling, but the article upset me a lot. A big thank you to those of you who never gave up and went to another rescue or went through petfinder.
 
I think it's good to have a clause that states an animal must be returned to the rescue if you adopter can no longer care for it. It's in the best interest of the animal because someone can easily just drop off the animal at a kill rescue if they change their mind down the road. Ellen should have returned the pet to the rescue and let them know she found a home for it instead of giving it away. Rescued animals have already been abandoned once. It's not fair to subject them to the possibility of being rehomed again and again or be euthanized when the rescue is willing to take it back. There are a lot of rescues out there with very different requirements. If someone is rejected by one, contact other rescues to see if you qualify. It's better to rescue or adopt than to support pet mills or breeding.
 
I remember that whole Ellen Degeneres controversy and I sided with the rescue, too. What irked me was the excuse that it devastated the kid of the person she took it upon herself to rehome. Yeah, so kids get disappointed; it's not the end of the world. Again, when did kids run the world? Big pet peeve of mine, sorry about the pun. The only reason why I did the rehoming myself in my case (and it took a year) was because the rescue had either changed its number or went out of 'business' so to speak.
 
The rescue we work with and even the local pound have clauses that if you can no longer care for / want the animal, you have to return it to them. The rescue would treat the animal well and I support that. I have to admit I'm creeped out by a pound wanting the animal back when it is a kill-shelter and the small animals don't exactly get priority status on death row.
 
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