Where People & Piggies Thrive

Newbie or Guinea Guru? Popcorn in!

Register for free to enjoy the full benefits.
Find out more about the NEW, drastically improved site and forum!

Register

Sad Rehoming my sweet little piggies

angie901

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
367
Hey everyone! I know what you are thinking. I only had my piggies for a couple of weeks. But a couple of days ago my dad told me that the piggies where just costing too much and we don't have the room for them. So There is a lady that is taking them in. I'm really sad about this, and I'm sorry to make you guys sad. Sorry but I do not have any pictures of them, I only have those two pictures of them. I will be volunteering for the shelter again, so I could take pictures of all the shelter guinea pigs! Sorry everyone! Feel free to pour all your thoughts and comments.:weepy:
 
I'm very sorry that you have to give up your pigs. Though I think that next time you get an animal, you will need to talk about it more with your family, and think about it more too. Guinea pigs are a life commitment, and are not free to take care of. Everyone in the household needs to be aware of what it takes to care for one, the time and cost, among other things.
 
I'm very sorry that you have to give up your pigs. Though I think that next time you get an animal, you will need to talk about it more with your family, and think about it more too. Guinea pigs are a life commitment, and are not free to take care of. Everyone in the household needs to be aware of what it takes to care for one, the time and cost, among other things.

Thank you. You are right, but we did talk the guinea pig thing over for months and my dad just lost his job, and so we couldn't afford to care for them anymore. Sorry I should have put that. Also we had NO idea he was going to loose his job, but I guess they didn't need him anymore. Well the rest is kind of personal. Actually what I told you, was kind of, personal. But you know, you need to know what the base of that is.
 
I think you've done the responsible thing here. There are times when life throws you these curves and you have some tough decisions to make. The loss of a job is devastating and can be life changing. My company closed a few years back with little warning and it was very unnerving, even though my husband still had his job. With your dad being the primary income earner, I'm sure there was no other choice. I think it's great that you will continue to volunteer at the shelter. It shows that your heart is in the right place. I hope things get better for your family. Good luck to your dad finding a new job.
 
I think you've done the responsible thing here. There are times when life throws you these curves and you have some tough decisions to make. The loss of a job is devastating and can be life changing. My company closed a few years back with little warning and it was very unnerving, even though my husband still had his job. With your dad being the primary income earner, I'm sure there was no other choice. I think it's great that you will continue to volunteer at the shelter. It shows that your heart is in the right place. I hope things get better for your family. Good luck to your dad finding a new job.

Thank you so much! Your words made me feel so much better! I couldn't thank you enough. You are a very great person. Yes once my dad finds a job we will talk about owning guinea pigs. But we will have to think about it for a couple of months. And I will post updates! I promise. The lady is coming to pick them up on friday.
 
Hi Angie,

I really do feel for you. I think it's hard to have animals when you are not the one who makes the final decision about them.

However, I still think you should try to keep your pigs.

There are a few options:

1. Post a thread and see if anyone would be willing to foster them for a few months. Explain the situation and see if someone would be willing to take them just while your family is going through hard times. I am pretty sure some people do it with dogs, and many people here are very dedicated and might help.

2. I am not sure how old you are, but you could try to get a part-time job on weekends, and if you already have one, maybe cut out all other expenses, like movies, lunch, etc. - those things really add up, even with a full-time job. You can get about 45 lbs of hay for about $60, and that should last you about 4 months at least. That's $15 a month. Veggies are pricy, but if you just do the basics (red/green lettuce, bell pepper, and cilantro), you could probably do $10 a week, and you can get Carefresh for the litter box at 3 for $50, which should last you about a month. 10 pounds of pellets for $30 (with shipping) from Kleenmama's should last about 3 month. That's about $120 a month. Now, that's also a pretty high estimate of someone who lives in New York and has a full-time job. You could try to use Aspen instead of Carefresh and get the hay locally. Hopefully, you can cut it down to about $80 a month. A part time job should more than cover it. Also, you can ask for any birthday/christmas presents from relatives to go towards piggies.

3. As for space, just offer to keep them in your room - I lived in a TINY dorm room in college, and even that had enough room for a 2x3 if you got creative.

4. Vet bills. Yes, that's by far the hardest part. Again, I would try to save up as much as possible. If you get/have a part-time job though, you should be able to save up the bare minimum in a few month.

5. Most importantly, talk to your parents. Let them know how much the piggies mean to you. Tell them it's your first priority (if it's not, obviously don't lie and say that). I know you may feel like you are just a kid, but you do have a say, and if you show them that you are willing to sacrifice a lot of other things, they may be more willing to keep them.

I have kept my piggy through a job loss (and I was on my own). I did it all wrong and didn't focus enough on her needs and would allocate money very differently if, God forbid, it happened today, but we DID make it through. I think the main thing to remember is that they are part of the family too. I know that may be a hard point for your parents to understand, but if you can save up some money and pay for their expenses, you will be able to determine the care that they get.
 
You could also ask your local grocer for old veggies or ones that have fallen on the floor for the piggies.

Summer is here! Go to the dollar store buy some seeds and grow some veggies for them.

Switch to fleece over shavings. It's cheaper in the long run. Get an old fleece blanket and use that. It will be cheaper than buying yards of fleece.

I don't know how old you are but for someone who is too young for a regular job there is always babysitting, lawn mowing, leaf raking, etc. My first job was caddying when I was 13.

Neighbors may also donate veggies to help feed your guinea pigs.

Try locating a local feed store or talking to your FFA teacher and find a bail of hay. (grass hay only, no fiscue, no alfalfa mixes) for cheap. I have 4 guinea pigs and a bail of hay last me 8 months for 12 dollars.

I know the decision isn't completely in your power but it may be worth a try. Especially if you can work or sell some old things to make a bit of money to offset your parents cost to the piggies.
 
Hi! I am so sorry that you have to give your piggies away :(
I know how you feel, but maybe you could get some one to foster you guinea pigs while you earn money to pay for them. Some ways you can save money are

1. Try to grow your own vegetables
2. Use aspen bedding or fleece instead of normal bedding(its cheaper)
3.Tell your parents how much you love and want to keep your pigs and maybe they will help you earn some money to pay for them
4. If you do get to keep them buy supplies like bedding and food(not veggies) in bulk cause it will save you a lot of money

Again, im so sorry! i hope you will be able to keep them:(
 
Also, if you have one and haven't already, offer to give up your cell phone. A smart phone with a data plan can EASILY run over $70 a month, which should cover all the basics for the piggies.

If your parents say that they want you to have a cell phone for safety, you can switch to a prepaid one with just minutes, no texting or web and significantly cut the cost.
 
Hi Angie,

I really do feel for you. I think it's hard to have animals when you are not the one who makes the final decision about them.




















However, I still think you should try to keep your pigs.

There are a few options:

1. Post a thread and see if anyone would be willing to foster them for a few months. Explain the situation and see if someone would be willing to take them just while your family is going through hard times. I am pretty sure some people do it with dogs, and many people here are very dedicated and might help.

2. I am not sure how old you are, but you could try to get a part-time job on weekends, and if you already have one, maybe cut out all other expenses, like movies, lunch, etc. - those things really add up, even with a full-time job. You can get about 45 lbs of hay for about $60, and that should last you about 4 months at least. That's $15 a month. Veggies are pricy, but if you just do the basics (red/green lettuce, bell pepper, and cilantro), you could probably do $10 a week, and you can get Carefresh for the litter box at 3 for $50, which should last you about a month. 10 pounds of pellets for $30 (with shipping) from Kleenmama's should last about 3 month. That's about $120 a month. Now, that's also a pretty high estimate of someone who lives in New York and has a full-time job. You could try to use Aspen instead of Carefresh and get the hay locally. Hopefully, you can cut it down to about $80 a month. A part time job should more than cover it. Also, you can ask for any birthday/christmas presents from relatives to go towards piggies.

3. As for space, just offer to keep them in your room - I lived in a TINY dorm room in college, and even that had enough room for a 2x3 if you got creative.

4. Vet bills. Yes, that's by far the hardest part. Again, I would try to save up as much as possible. If you get/have a part-time job though, you should be able to save up the bare minimum in a few month.

5. Most importantly, talk to your parents. Let them know how much the piggies mean to you. Tell them it's your first priority (if it's not, obviously don't lie and say that). I know you may feel like you are just a kid, but you do have a say, and if you show them that you are willing to sacrifice a lot of other things, they may be more willing to keep them.

I have kept my piggy through a job loss (and I was on my own). I did it all wrong and didn't focus enough on her needs and would allocate money very differently if, God forbid, it happened today, but we DID make it through. I think the main thing to remember is that they are part of the family too. I know that may be a hard point for your parents to understand, but if you can save up some money and pay for their expenses, you will be able to determine the care that they get.



I would love to do all those things.But i'm afraid the lady is coming to pick them up on saturday
 
You could also ask your local grocer for old veggies or ones that have fallen on the floor for the piggies.

Summer is here! Go to the dollar store buy some seeds and grow some veggies for them.

Switch to fleece over shavings. It's cheaper in the long run. Get an old fleece blanket and use that. It will be cheaper than buying yards of fleece.

I don't know how old you are but for someone who is too young for a regular job there is always babysitting, lawn mowing, leaf raking, etc. My first job was caddying when I was 13.

Neighbors may also donate veggies to help feed your guinea pigs.

Try locating a local feed store or talking to your FFA teacher and find a bail of hay. (grass hay only, no fiscue, no alfalfa mixes) for cheap. I have 4 guinea pigs and a bail of hay last me 8 months for 12 dollars.

I know the decision isn't completely in your power but it may be worth a try. Especially if you can work or sell some old things to make a bit of money to offset your parents cost to the piggies.

That's a pretty good idea,but see the lady is coming on friday, sorry not saturday.
 
Hi! I am so sorry that you have to give your piggies away :(
I know how you feel, but maybe you could get some one to foster you guinea pigs while you earn money to pay for them. Some ways you can save money are

1. Try to grow your own vegetables
2. Use aspen bedding or fleece instead of normal bedding(its cheaper)
3.Tell your parents how much you love and want to keep your pigs and maybe they will help you earn some money to pay for them
4. If you do get to keep them buy supplies like bedding and food(not veggies) in bulk cause it will save you a lot of money

Again, im so sorry! i hope you will be able to keep them:(

I use fleece. I'm not sure this is going to work. i will try for the piggies sake for your guys sake and for mine.
 
What kind of questions did you sk this woman? You can check at the shelter to find out what kind of questions to ask to make sure they are going to a good home. Make sure she doesn't own snakes!
 
They are still YOURS. You are allowed to say that you have found a way to keep them. If she is a true animal lover, she will understand and be happy they didn't lose their home. And if she doesn't, then maybe she is not a great choice to begin with.

And going off of what Petlovr said, there are many concerns with giving them to someone else. They may not be dedicated to the piggies. They may not have the finances either. They may rehome them when they get tired of them. Here's something from a site about rehoming pitbull-type dogs: "If you provide love, a daily walk, some space (which doesn't have to be a lot, just enough), proper training, and food and water, your dog has a much better home than most of those looking for placement." I think this can be applied to guinea pigs word for word. You are their best shot, if for no other reason than because you care and have the proper information. Tons of people out there are OK with using a pet store cage, low quality pellets, and no greens. They are also OK not taking them to the vet. If you are willing to work and save up for an emergency vet fund (you can start with saving around $500 and then add more) and feed them good food and keep them in a C&C, you probably are better than most homes.

You could try not using bedding at all (I don't know if you do) - you can even do the kitchen area with fleece.

And don't worry about us or trying for us - definitely do it for you and the piggies.

I have had some experience with difficult situations with animals. First, my family moved from another country, across the ocean, when I was twelve. We left behind a 120-pound rottweiller. The intention always was to bring him with us, which I greatly credit my mom for, but I don't think it hurt, that I refused to buy or accept anything other than necessities until we saved up enough money to get him over here. I don't know how much difference it made, but considering that parents generally love their kids, I think when they know something is a top priority in your life, it makes a difference. The dog came over about a half a year after we did :)

Later, a few years after college, I started fostering a dog, and he ended up staying with me. Then, I hit a really hard patch. My landlord told me I had to give him up or move out in the middle of my lease. I had to find a subletter, find a new place, and move, all while having almost no money and just one person to help. That same month, I went through a painful break-up. I was low on money and time, and I just felt like I couldn't do it any more. In that time, I have seriously considered rehoming him. I never did. He is at home right now sleeping on the couch :) I thank God I didn't give him up - it feels like one of the things I did right in my life. It feels good inside, and it's something that I can be proud of myself for. I think, even though it's really hard in the short run, you will find that sticking by your animals will feel right and like going in the right direction. Plus, your family may follow your lead, and you will be showing them by example how guinea pigs are for life.
 
Last edited:
Also, I just want to add one more thing. I am in my mid-twenties. I have had my oldest piggy since college. I have lost and found jobs. I've moved. My friends have moved to get advance degrees in different states. My parents are in a different state, and there are definitely times when we have our issues. There have been times when I was in a completely new place feeling completely alone. And there have been good times to :)

Through all this, my two piggies and my dog have been my family. I come home to them every night, and I FEEL at home.
 
People, where has this person solicited advice on keeping these pigs? Because I don't see it, so why are we offering up suggestions, to the point of obviously laying a guilt trip, so that she can keep them? She's 15 years old, she doesn't make the decisions in the household - she isn't the primary earner. Even if she does get a job, with the family's situation being what it is, what's to say some of her income wouldn't need to contribute to family expenses?

I appreciate the notion of encouraging responsible ownership and if there was a way for her to keep her pets, absolutely, I can offer suggestions till the cows come home, but we have no idea what the entirety of her situation is and whether or not we're actually encouraging the most responsible course of actions or not. She knows her situation and I'm sure many of us (myself most certainly included) can relate to the stress of a job loss and understand how much strain that puts on a family. If the decision has been made to rehome the animals, I think the first couple folks who replied were right on - it's probably the most responsible decision and quite honestly is probably in the best interest of the family AND the pigs.

What if, as a result of this turn of events, they have to move to an apartment where no pets are allowed? What would be the recommendation then? Keep them hidden when the landlord comes by and risk losing the home altogether? Or have to rehome them on such short notice the possibility of handing them over to a snake owner might actually be a real possibility?

Like I said, I appreciate the encouragement to keep the pets, but there ARE times when rehoming them can be the right thing and considering that no one knows her situation better than her, I don't think it's our place to stand in judgment or start a campaign to persuade her to keep them when the decision really isn't hers in the first place.

Angie, I am sorry for your situation. I do think it's important that you learn from this situation in the future, if the time comes when you and your family entertain the idea of getting more pets. They are a lifetime commitment and part of being a responsible pet owner is having the foresight to plan ahead for anticipated needs and life changes. That said, it can also be a responsible decision to give them up in hopes that they might have a better life than you can provide in the near future. So I'd suggest carefully selecting the home they are going to, which could and should probably also be a family decision, and making the most of the situation you are in now.

If you are in a place where you want to keep your pigs, we can of course offer ways to cut costs and suggestions for making that happen, but I don't want you to feel pressured to do so because of a fear of "letting us down." It's a personal situation and you need to focus on resolving it so that your family is happy AND that the pigs are placed in what will hopefully be a permanent, loving home. If you want to look into having someone foster them, that's also a reasonable idea, but I know that the economy being what it is, it's possible it might need to become a permanent rehome and I also think it's fairly unlikely that you'll find a person able to take full financial responsibility of the animals for a short (or long) period of time until you may be able to take them back. Good luck, and please keep us posted on how it works out.
 
What kind of questions did you sk this woman? You can check at the shelter to find out what kind of questions to ask to make sure they are going to a good home. Make sure she doesn't own snakes!

Actually, she is an old work friend of my moms. and I mean a really old friend. And she was looking for guinea pigs and emailed me, and found out I was the daughter of her old working friend. And we went to her house and checked everything out and it seems really fun for a guinea pig.
 
Also, I just want to add one more thing. I am in my mid-twenties. I have had my oldest piggy since college. I have lost and found jobs. I've moved. My friends have moved to get advance degrees in different states. My parents are in a different state, and there are definitely times when we have our issues. There have been times when I was in a completely new place feeling completely alone. And there have been good times to :)

Through all this, my two piggies and my dog have been my family. I come home to them every night, and I FEEL at home.

I understand. Guess what? She said she would foster them for me! Just incase my dad finds a job! Thank you all for your help!
 
Yayyyy!!!! I am soooo happy for you!!!!
 
That's great news......
 
Status
This thread has been closed due to inactivity. You can create a new thread to discuss this topic.

Similar threads

M
Replies
3
Views
166
Mamallama385
M
Squeakybabies
Replies
3
Views
180
Guinea Pig Papa
Guinea Pig Papa
Wasser2018
Replies
1
Views
315
ItsaZoo
ItsaZoo
G
Replies
1
Views
375
ItsaZoo
ItsaZoo
GraspingAtVines
Replies
6
Views
249
needaguru
needaguru
Top