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Introductions New Addition to the Family!

PiggyManic

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Everyone, meet Bubbles! I had gotten her two days ago. She's roughly 6 weeks old, and she's A-DOR-A-BLE!! She's staying with the bunny for two weeks, this way I know if she's okay or not, then I'm putting her in with the other piggies. I'm also going to add an extension to the cage.

Uploadfromtaptalk1402530185398
 
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pigger123

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She is very cute! However, I would advise against keeping her with a rabbit. Even if they get along well together, a rabbit could get startled and kick out at the piggy, accidentally injuring or even killing her. Plus, they require different types of pellets, so it might be hard to make sure they have a good diet.
 

Rywen

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Bubbles is adorable, she has wacky hair, lol.
 

Bodhi

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Great picture lol
Little bubbles

I hope she is welcomed into your guinea pig family. I would be more worried for her safety around a large rabbit than any guinea pigs, however.
 

PiggyManic

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Yes. I realize the concern, but the rabbit is still very little, and eats Guinea pig pellets, and has eaten Guinea pig pellets when Daisy was with him. Nestle, the bunny, has been perfectly healthy from eating either Guinea pig pellets or rabbit pellets, and there's no sand in his pee. Daisy also came out just fine.
 

PiggieWigglies

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There are many reasons why pigs shouldn't be housed with rabbits. [MENTION=19358]Inle_Rabbit[/MENTION]
 

pinky

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Guinea pigs should NEVER be housed with or interact with rabbits, even young ones. Rabbits can carry bordatella which is fatal to guinea pigs. Rabbits, even bunnies, have strong hind legs and a quick kick can kill a guinea pig. Please separate them asap.
 

PiggyManic

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Guinea pigs should NEVER be housed with or interact with rabbits, even young ones. Rabbits can carry bordatella which is fatal to guinea pigs. Rabbits, even bunnies, have strong hind legs and a quick kick can kill a guinea pig. Please separate them asap.

I would if I could. Daisy was housed with Nestle before. I hadn't known this was a bad thing. I'll see to letting Nestle go tomorrow.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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Letting the rabbit go? Please clarify this statement.
 

PiggyManic

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Letting the rabbit go? Please clarify this statement.

Three words. Lost baby rabbit. I had gone to a BBQ, and a guy there had found 3 baby rabbits, lost, without a mom. I had got to keep one, and I made sure it was healthy, which it was, and I fell in love with him, sadly though, I know he's a wild animal. He had to have been let go at some point.
 

aspecht

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Oh no. You should NEVER bring home wild rabbits. The mother did not abandon them. The mother checks on them only a couple times throughout the night and leaves them alone during the day to deter predators. Never bring home wild rabbits.

Also, rabbits are natural carriers of pasteurella which is deadly to guinea pigs. This is one of many reasons they should never be housed together.
 

PiggyManic

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Three words. Lost baby rabbit. I had gone to a BBQ, and a guy there had found 3 baby rabbits, lost, without a mom. I had got to keep one, and I made sure it was healthy, which it was, and I fell in love with him, sadly though, I know he's a wild animal. He had to have been let go at some point.

I know this now, and I'm sorry, but I cannot let him go now, and the mother wasn't coming back, either. I wasn't even the one who had found them. I will see to letting him go tomorrow.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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How long have you had this wild rabbit? It may not be a good idea to let it go if you have had it for any length of time. You may need to seek a wildlife rehabilitator.

Just to clarify for anyone: Baby rabbits will wonder around the nest site once they are old enough. If you see healthy baby rabbits with eyes open Mom is likely very near by. Does will move their babies occasionally once they can walk. You rarely will see the adult.

The doe will usually only check her small babies 2 times a day to try and keep predators away. If the babies are warm, fat and the nest is not torn apart there is no reason to remove the babies. If a person is worried check the babies the following day to see if they are still warm and fat, if they are mom has been there to see her young.
 

PiggyManic

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How long have you had this wild rabbit? It may not be a good idea to let it go if you have had it for any length of time. You may need to seek a wildlife rehabilitator.

Just to clarify for anyone: Baby rabbits will wonder around the nest site once they are old enough. If you see healthy baby rabbits with eyes open Mom is likely very near by. Does will move their babies occasionally once they can walk. You rarely will see the adult.

The doe will usually only check her small babies 2 times a day to try and keep predators away. If the babies are warm, fat and the nest is not torn apart there is no reason to remove the babies. If a person is worried check the babies the following day to see if they are still warm and fat, if they are mom has been there to see her young.

None of the bunnies were moving and their eyes were all closed. And I've had Nestle for almost a month, I believe. He's still pretty wild.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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Before rabbits can open their eyes they don't move much more than a wiggle. Scared babies will play dead.

If they were fat, warm and in a nest they should have stayed there, but what's done is done.

If you've been hand feeding and nursing him for a month you need to contact a wildlife rescue to properly reintroduce him to the wild. If his eyes were closed and you've had him a month that makes him 5-6 weeks old and too young to be thrown out into the wild without being rehabilitated.
 

PiggyManic

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Before rabbits can open their eyes they don't move much more than a wiggle. Scared babies will play dead.

If they were fat, warm and in a nest they should have stayed there, but what's done is done.

If you've been hand feeding and nursing him for a month you need to contact a wildlife rescue to properly reintroduce him to the wild. If his eyes were closed and you've had him a month that makes him 5-6 weeks old and too young to be thrown out into the wild without being rehabilitated.

He was a couple weeks old when I got him, it's just they weren't in a nest, they weren't moving, and their eyes were closed when he had found them.

Also, I had read somewhere that Guinea pigs could be with rabbits. Hence why Daisy and Nestle are childhood friends.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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If his eyes were closed he was 10 days or less old. If he had fur he was 3 days or older. Rabbits start to open their eyes at 10 days, they start growing fur at 3 days.

There is lots of misinformation on the Internet one of which is rabbits and guinea pigs can live together safely and happily. This
 

PiggyManic

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If his eyes were closed he was 10 days or less old. If he had fur he was 3 days or older. Rabbits start to open their eyes at 10 days, they start growing fur at 3 days.

There is lots of misinformation on the Internet one of which is rabbits and guinea pigs can live together safely and happily. This

Again, I'm sorry. But he's eligible for being let out in the wild.

Also, this thread has gone off topic.
 

sallyvh

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Not to be offensive but if you just let the rabbit go outside you're sentencing it to death. You took on these responsibilities and it's your job to ensure health and safety to these animals. Just "letting it go" is in no way an acceptable solution for a baby wild rabbit that has been hand raised by someone not educated in rehabilitation and release. Do the responsible thing and separate the rabbit and guinea right away. If the plan is to not keep the rabbit, try your hardest to find a sanctuary or rehabilitation center.
 

PiggyManic

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Not to be offensive but if you just let the rabbit go outside you're sentencing it to death. You took on these responsibilities and it's your job to ensure health and safety to these animals. Just "letting it go" is in no way an acceptable solution for a baby wild rabbit that has been hand raised by someone not educated in rehabilitation and release. Do the responsible thing and separate the rabbit and guinea right away. If the plan is to not keep the rabbit, try your hardest to find a sanctuary or rehabilitation center.

I had only hand fed it for the first few days. He started eating and drinking on his own a few days after getting him. He's capable of going out on his own. Heck, I can't even pet him anymore. He's too fast.

I cannot separate them without risking my dog eating him alive.

I will see what I can do. I'm not trying to be a bad pet owner, and it's hard just thinking about saying bye to Nestle, but I hadn't known it was a bad thing to have both Guinea pigs and rabbits together, and I would've gotten a domestic bunny so it would've been easier to take care of it, but I fell in love with Nestle, and I wasn't going to have more than one rabbit.

But I would honestly like this topic to go back on topic.
 
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