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My pet store experience yesterday.

What you aren't considering is that babies are not the cute and cuddly creatures that you are probably imagining. They aren't socialized, can be difficult to handle, can squirm or and jump out of your hands and rely on you to socialize them. If you're busy with other activities, you'll probably end up with an adult that doesn't like being handled. I would challenge you to go to a few different rescues and shelters and pick up and hold males and females of different ages to see the difference. Be a responsible pet owner and think it through before you get one. It takes a skilled owner to be able to handle the babies. You don't mention your age but the other thing I want you to consider is that if your "baby" lives to be 8 or 9 years of age, how do you plan to coordinate caring for it if you go off to college or get involved with other activities? Three of mine are cast offs from teens who selected babies but decided that they no longer had time for them when they got too busy. You need a back up plan with family members so they don't end up being rehomed later. We recommend that the guinea pigs be a family pet to save them from being abandoned later.
 
Gerbils, hamsters, even rats have a lifespan of 2 years or less (of course there are some exceptions to this) but a guinea pig lives 5-7 years on average and many times, longer than that. So adopting an adult isn't robbing you of any time spent with the pig.

If you've never owned a guinea pig before, I recommend getting an older pig that will be easier to handle. Like Pinky said, babies aren't the cuddly critters that people think they are. Sure, they are cute but they are also tiny and fast and don't sit still very long. They need handling to get used to people and are otherwise jumpy. Literally...they will jump right out of your hands and if you aren't ready for it, could jump to the ground and injure themselves. Until you are experienced at handling guinea pigs, it's probably not a good idea for you to get a baby.

You might look to Critter Corral, I know that a pregnant female did recently have a litter there at the rescue. I can't say for sure what the ratio of males to female babies there were but I do believe it was within the last month or so.

Pinky would probably have more information about it than I would. But I know they already have the babies listed on the petfinder site for Critter Corral.
 
Here is my opinion based on my experiences: I bought my first pig from Petco and she ended up first being pregnant and having 2 babies. She delivered 3 weeks after buying her. Then a few days after delivering she was showing signs of being sick (they hide their illnesses because thats their instinct and therefore the show signs when they are very ill). She ended up having a Upper Respiratory Infection, $1200.00 later she is just now better (3 months later) and it was very stressful on me and the pigs. $1200.00!!! thats a lot of money to spend on a exotic vet but that's what it took to make her better.Are you willing to spend that much if you buy a sick pig? Most pigs that come from a pet store have these exact problems and you don't want to go through what I went through. Now about the age...The pig I got was about 6 months. She was not easy at first but she warmed up to me and shes my little girl now. But her babies are difficult and I mean real difficult! They are not friendly like her and they are scared and need lots of extra attention and bonding time. So at first i thought babies were better but now that I have babies and a 9 month old pig I'd prefer the older pig because they are sweeter and easier to handle. Now because she had two babies, one was a female and the other a male. I had to separate the babies while she was sick and when she was better I finally put the female baby with the mom and the male needs to be in a separate cage so he can't mate with the females. So I looked into getting him a friend. Instead of getting another pig from a store I got help from this forum and found a near rescue and adopted a HEALTHY, known young male to be his buddy. Next I had to build another cage, and the rescue had cubes and chloroplast so she helped me make the cages stacked. Females cage on top and males below. This was a lot of work and money for a $40 petco pig who was pregnant and sick. Please do the right thing and adopt a pig. It was a great feeling adopting Momo my latest male pig. He was left with his family in a box in a park and then picked up and brought to a shelter and then to this rescue. It is important that you try not to be selfish in your thinking and try to help animals as well as your wanting a pet. Please be smart about you choice.
 
I've only had my piggies for about seven months, and I can tell you, at three years, they are as energetic as can be. I agree with what someone before me mentioned, a baby may look cute and cuddly but they are still too young to have become accustomed to people and being handled. They haven't been socialized yet.

The rescue I got my girls from had two babies the day I went in. Not once did they leave the safety of their pigloo. When a volunteer asked me if I wanted to hold one of the babies, I of course got excited and said yes. Well, once I had that little sow in my arms, she would not sit still. I was so scared of dropping her. She also kept nipping my arm.
When I held one of my piggies the first time, she just calmly sat in arms, giving my fingers kisses.

I really do hope you reconsider and choose to adopt. In your first post, you said you e-mailed a shelter, received no reply and gave up. If you really wanted to rescue a pig, you would e-mail again or call, not give up the moment you encounter your first obstacle.
 
Sarien is right. You can't just email a rescue and after no response, give up and say, "Oh well, I tried". Saying you tried without having really done so, is just an excuse to go back to the easier and more convenient route of buying. How many times did you try to contact the rescue? Did you try more than one rescue? Did you go to the rescue in person to see the pigs? Did you inquire to see if they have a website you can look at?

I have traveled over 2 hours to get to Critter Corral on more than one occasion and many people here have gone longer distances than that to get to a rescue. So saying you dont have one near you is not an excuse. Many will either meet you halfway and some may even bring the pig(s) to you. Unlike petstores, a rescue's main focus is to find a good home for their animals and if it means finding volunteers to form a piggy train to bring the pig(s) to you, then they just might do that.
 
I adopted Ruby from a rescue where she was kept alone & not bonded with any other sows. She wasn't that cute either, but she was sweet, cuddly, knew her name and got along famously with my other female Riblet.

@LilPig, did you get Ruby from Critter Corral? I remember seeing a long-haired white female with pink eyes named Ruby at Critter Corral when I had been there in a past. Just curious if it was the same pig.
 
Just an FYI: I just checked - there are currently 3 young female guinea pigs at Critter Corral. Incidentally, there are many more at CC that are outside your strict parameters that you might take a look at as well.
 
Does anyone know where there is a rescue in South Dakota?
 
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