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Not Eating Malocclusion or scurvy or both?

mbvogt

Member
Cavy Gazer
Joined
Feb 4, 2023
Messages
7
Hello,
I am new here but desperate. I have two male Guinea pigs ages 14 months and 2 years 8 months. I rescued them in late 2021. They have literally saved my and my son’s sanity. They bring us so much joy!

Scampy, the 14-month old, recently stopped eating and drinking. I took him to the emergency animal hospital and then the vet the next day. The vet said his teeth were growing incorrectly, over his tongue, etc. so he filed them. I asked what had caused this to happen and was told maybe genetics or scurvy! I feed my Guinea pigs all kinds of organic vegetables and some fruits, orchard hay, pellets and water. I’m struggling to understand how this could possibly be scurvy and wondering if his teeth will ever be normal again or if he will need them filed every 4 weeks for life?? I’m feeling terrible RN and this isn’t about me, it’s about my pets. I’m syringe-feeding him but he hates it and so do I. I’m afraid he’s going to die of this problem. Any advice is welcome. Thank you in advance.
 
I'm not a vet, but it doesn't seem to me that scurvy could be in any way involved with teeth that need filing.

It's hard to know at this point whether planing his teeth is a one-off thing, or if it will need to be repeated. If it's a genetic problem, he will need regular planings. If it's because he hasn't been getting enough hay in his diet (hay is what keeps the teeth ground down), then more high quality hay and fewer veggies and pellets may take care of it. It will take a few weeks to know.

He shouldn't need to be hand fed but a day or so. It's very hard to plane guinea pig molars without nicking the gums, and that makes their mouth very sore. But he should be eating normally within a couple of days.

BTW, was this an exotic vet that did the dental work?
 
If he had scurvy he would have other issues aside from teeth. How did they file his teeth? Was he put under for it?
 
Hello, yes, it was an exotic vet, and yes, Scampy was anesthetized for the dental procedure. He has started eating veggies again but apparently not enough because he lost 11 grams since February 3rd. So, I syringe-fed him some carrot baby food. I am still feeding him vegetables, pellets (which he’s not eating RN, and hay).

As for the hay, we have noticed he tries to eat it, but it falls out of his mouth. I also see him making strange movements with his mouth (like there’s something stuck in his teeth?) and he frequently brings his paw to his mouth (not grooming).

What constitutes “high-quality” hay? I have obtained hay from different places such as a grain and farm supply store, Amazon, and the rescue organization.

What are the other early signs of scurvy? By the way, my older Guinea pig (age 2 years 9 months) constantly bites his back and has a V-shaped bald spot as a result. I had him examined for mites, fungus, parasites, etc but he has none of those. Could self-barbering in one spot be related to scurvy?
 
If you've got a guinea pig with a v-shaped bald spot, it has mites. Guaranteed. It's THE most classic sign for mites. Just treat him for them. And don't trust any vet who examined him and told you he didn't have them.

High quality hay is green and smells fresh, isn't dry and dusty. The last few years haven't been good for hay harvest, so you may have to look around for it. Companies like Small Pet Select, American Pet Diner, and Oxbow generally have good hay. The first two are online only, and I think Oxbow will ship larger boxes to local stores for you to pick up.

If you're hand feeding him, I'd suggest Critical Care rather than baby food. It's a more balanced food and has more texture than carrots. That's important if he's not eating hay right now.
 
If you've got a guinea pig with a v-shaped bald spot, it has mites. Guaranteed. It's THE most classic sign for mites. Just treat him for them. And don't trust any vet who examined him and told you he didn't have them.

High quality hay is green and smells fresh, isn't dry and dusty. The last few years haven't been good for hay harvest, so you may have to look around for it. Companies like Small Pet Select, American Pet Diner, and Oxbow generally have good hay. The first two are online only, and I think Oxbow will ship larger boxes to local stores for you to pick up.

If you're hand feeding him, I'd suggest Critical Care rather than baby food. It's a more balanced food and has more texture than carrots. That's important if he's not eating hay right now.
How exactly do I treat for mites? I see “Ivermectin” listed everywhere but no detailed instructions. Where is the best place to obtain Ivermectin and in what form? Once I have it, then what ? Thank you so much.
 
I'm sorry to hear about Scampy's health issues, but it's great to hear that you're taking such good care of him and that he's brought so much joy into your life. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  1. Scurvy is caused by a lack of vitamin C in the diet, which can lead to a range of health issues, including dental problems. It's good that you're feeding your Guinea pigs a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, but it's worth double-checking whether they're getting enough vitamin C. Guinea pigs can't produce their own vitamin C, so they need to get it from their diet. Some good sources of vitamin C for Guinea pigs include bell peppers, kale, broccoli, and strawberries.
  2. It's possible that Scampy's dental problems are genetic, but it's hard to say for sure without more information. If you haven't already, it's a good idea to ask the vet whether there are any specific things you should be looking out for in terms of dental issues with Guinea pigs.
  3. It's possible that Scampy's teeth may need to be filed regularly to prevent them from growing incorrectly, but again, it's hard to say without more information. Some Guinea pigs do need to have their teeth filed regularly, while others don't. If you're concerned about the frequency of the dental work that Scampy needs, it's worth having a conversation with your vet about it.
  4. Syringe-feeding can be difficult and stressful for both you and your Guinea pig, so it's worth exploring other options if possible. For example, you could try offering Scampy a variety of soft foods that are easier for him to eat, such as mashed sweet potato or cooked pumpkin. It's also worth asking your vet whether there are any supplements or medications that could help with Scampy's dental issues.
  5. Finally, it's important to monitor Scampy closely and seek veterinary care if his condition worsens or if he shows any other signs of illness. If you're ever unsure about something, don't hesitate to contact your vet for advice.
 
Thanks for the information.
 
I'm sorry to hear about Scampy's health issues, but it's great to hear that you're taking such good care of him and that he's brought so much joy into your life. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  1. Scurvy is caused by a lack of vitamin C in the diet, which can lead to a range of health issues, including dental problems. It's good that you're feeding your Guinea pigs a variety of organic vegetables and fruits, but it's worth double-checking whether they're getting enough vitamin C. Guinea pigs can't produce their own vitamin C, so they need to get it from their diet. Some good sources of vitamin C for Guinea pigs include bell peppers, kale, broccoli, and strawberries.
  2. It's possible that Scampy's dental problems are genetic, but it's hard to say for sure without more information. If you haven't already, it's a good idea to ask the vet whether there are any specific things you should be looking out for in terms of dental issues with Guinea pigs.
  3. It's possible that Scampy's teeth may need to be filed regularly to prevent them from growing incorrectly, but again, it's hard to say without more information. Some Guinea pigs do need to have their teeth filed regularly, while others don't. If you're concerned about the frequency of the dental work that Scampy needs, it's worth having a conversation with your vet about it.
  4. Syringe-feeding can be difficult and stressful for both you and your Guinea pig, so it's worth exploring other options if possible. For example, you could try offering Scampy a variety of soft foods that are easier for him to eat, such as mashed sweet potato or cooked pumpkin. It's also worth asking your vet whether there are any supplements or medications that could help with Scampy's dental issues.
  5. Finally, it's important to monitor Scampy closely and seek veterinary care if his condition worsens or if he shows any other signs of illness. If you're ever unsure about something, don't hesitate to contact your vet for advice.
I’m very happy to say that Scampy is doing much better, gaining weight, and behaving like an eager Guinea pig once again. I am very watchful for any sign of the previous avoidance of food and isolation.

My vet took a skin sample on my older GP and no mites were detected.

Thank you everyone!
 
Hello,
I am new here but desperate. I have two male Guinea pigs ages 14 months and 2 years 8 months. I rescued them in late 2021. They have literally saved my and my son’s sanity. They bring us so much joy!

Scampy, the 14-month old, recently stopped eating and drinking. I took him to the emergency animal hospital and then the vet the next day. The vet said his teeth were growing incorrectly, over his tongue, etc. so he filed them. I asked what had caused this to happen and was told maybe genetics or scurvy! I feed my Guinea pigs all kinds of organic vegetables and some fruits, orchard hay, pellets and water. I’m struggling to understand how this could possibly be scurvy and wondering if his teeth will ever be normal again or if he will need them filed every 4 weeks for life?? I’m feeling terrible RN and this isn’t about me, it’s about my pets. I’m syringe-feeding him but he hates it and so do I. I’m afraid he’s going to die of this problem. Any advice is welcome. Thank you in advance.
Hi. I don't think scurvy is the case. It must be a malocclusion. Malocclusion is where the guinea pig's teeth are incorrectly aligned. Keep taking your pig to the vet; he'll be better soon. Do you have chew toys for him? Chew toys can help with that too. I'm happy to help you and hope your little furry friend improves.
 
I’m very happy to say that Scampy is doing much better, gaining weight, and behaving like an eager Guinea pig once again. I am very watchful for any sign of the previous avoidance of food and isolation.

My vet took a skin sample on my older GP and no mites were detected.

Thank you everyone!
I'm so glad that Scampy is better!
 
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