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Keeping Warm Keeping pig warm during power outages.

SioCat

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For those of you that live in an area that gets snow, what is your backup plan if your electricity goes out?

Someone that I am acquainted with posted on Facebook a few years ago during winter time. The electricity had gone out (I'm unsure for how long) and killed both of her guinea pigs. This was well before I got my girl, but the story stuck with me and I think about it often.

In my area, it's gotten colder in the last couple of days. I started thinking about my friend and her guinea pigs. I currently don't have a back up plan, but if we had to all huddle in the car with the heater on, we could do that.

So, I am interested in hearing everyone's back up plans. What do you do to keep your pigs warm during blackouts?
 

Fick2010

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I honestly never even thought of it. My husband and I are gonna have to figure that out. Thank you very much for making me think about it before it happens. Last year my power was out for 5 days. I'm glad I didn't have my boys then.
 

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Thick fleece sleep sacks. My girl snuggles in it when it's too cool for her. Won't completely solve the problem for them with cold air, but gps love to burrow so a thick fleece sack at least will provide a nice blanket type of thing for them.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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Do you have a gas stove? Hot water bottles will work if so.
 

spudsthepiget

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I would do hot waterbottles and drape a blanket over their cage to insulate them. Instead of going out to the car, you could also run a very hot bath and close the door and let them have floor time in there; the steam would warm up a small space like that pretty quick.
 

Artista

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Do you have a gas stove? Hot water bottles will work if so.

I'd be concerned about gas fumes. If they are like birds, they have sensitive respiratory systems. I never use teflon for example because for birds, it could kill them if there is some kind of a defect.
 

pinky

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We've lost power on numerous occasions. The first thing I do is take them off fleece and replace it with regular bedding which doesn't need to be swept multiple times a day. Each cage gets multiple pigloos in it so they have places to huddle. I have hot water bottles that I put hot, but not boiling water, into and cover them in fleece so they won't chew on them. I cover each cage with a sheet and a down coat or comforter but leave a section open for ventilation. I boil water on the stove for a time, until it gets too steamy. The last time the power was out longer so I took them downstairs and into smaller cages with the pigloos and covers where it was warmer than the main level. I think since it's partially below ground, the sub-basement is better insulated and didn't get as cold. They handled it better than I did. Running a hot shower won't work if you need electricity to run your hot water heater. We have a private well so we don't have water when we lose power. I use bottled water to boil on the stove. Whenever bad weather (any season) is predicted that could result in the loss of power, I fill the tub with water I can use to flush the toilet.
 

pinky

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I'd be concerned about gas fumes. If they are like birds, they have sensitive respiratory systems. I never use teflon for example because for birds, it could kill them if there is some kind of a defect.

As long as you light the burners with a match and it ignites, you shouldn't have a problem with gas. It's no different than if you had a pot of soup boiling on the stove. Burning teflon releases chemicals that kill birds so that's why it's dangerous.
 

Inle_Rabbit

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If the OP has a gas stove chances are they use it took cook a few times a week at least. There is nothing wrong with gas appliances and they are often cheaper to run than their inefficient electric counter parts and a gas stove will work during a power outage where an electric one will not. As long as the gas is burning (or turned off) there is no risk of fumes.

I live in Texas now but I am from Michigan. I can only remember one time when the power was out for more than a few hours in winter. We were also stranded in our house due to a blizzard that buried the cars, barn and roads. I can remember that my father filled the tubs up with water for the toilets and also filled gallon jugs up with water for drinking and cooking before the blizzard moved in. Once the power went out and didn't come back on we hung old blankets up over the windows and doorways in the living room to keep at least one room warm. My father got a kerosene heater from the basement and started that going to produce heat. We had an iguana at the time and she got warm water bottles heated up on the stove. I think we also threw a blanket over her tank as well. The power was only out for a day and a half but the house we were in at the time was over 100 years old so it was not the best at keeping in the heat. Also during that time everyone got the stomach flu. It was awful but we all made it, even the lizard.
 

Artista

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Well, if you have a gas stove as your main stove then there are at least some gas fumes every time you cook, so I don't think heating up some water bottles with a gas stove would be enough to do any damage.

I thought you meant heating the area... :/
 

natsmom26

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This may be the time to get a generator, too. When the power went out for days here, you couldn't get one. They were out of stock for months.
 

SioCat

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We do have a gas stove. Hot water bottles are a good idea. When the electricity has gone out in the past, we all move to my bedroom on the second floor. We haven't covered the windows, but that's also a good idea! I do usually keep a big pot of water boiling on the stove. But that's normally because my husband and son always crave hot chocolate when the lights go out.

All good ideas, everyone! I hope that everyone has their own emergency kits made up and are able to stay safe this winter!
 

pinky

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This may be the time to get a generator, too. When the power went out for days here, you couldn't get one. They were out of stock for months.

We bought a generator after having multiple power outages in the summer that resulted in losing all our food in the fridge. Unless you have a commercial strength one, they're not powerful enough to run a furnace or a/c. We bought a small electric heater last winter when our furnace went out and had it on in our kitchen which has a ceramic tile floor. It threw enough heat to keep the gps comfortable in the dining room.
 

PrincessPiggy

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We set up a smaller cage (the big one is too big to move) in the warmest room in the house and drape blankets and towels over it, especially at night (though we leave at least a small, 2-inch or so "vent" open at one corner so they don't get too stuffy). We also give them hay to burrow in and their pigloos.

Unless you have a commercial strength one, they're not powerful enough to run a furnace or a/c.

We have a generator that runs our furnace, and I doubt it's commercial strength. It IS pretty big, though, and permanently situated at the side of the house (i.e. not a little portable generator), so I could be wrong. Almost everyone in our neighborhood has one because we almost always get one major power outage (3 days or more) each winter. Several years ago we had one that lasted 11 days after a big windstorm. Everyone was eating so much canned soup that all of the local grocery stores ran out of it. :D
 

RubyRain

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Lots of great ideas.

Also look where you cage is located. If it's against an outside wall (will be colder than interior walls), move the cage to another interior wall or at least away from the wall if that is possible.
If you cannot move the cage, put blankets or towels between the wall and cage to insulate against the chilly wall a little.

If you have your cage on a cement floor or tile floor, consider putting some blankets or towels under the cage to insulate a little too.
 

pinky

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We set up a smaller cage (the big one is too big to move) in the warmest room in the house and drape blankets and towels over it, especially at night (though we leave at least a small, 2-inch or so "vent" open at one corner so they don't get too stuffy). We also give them hay to burrow in and their pigloos.



We have a generator that runs our furnace, and I doubt it's commercial strength. It IS pretty big, though, and permanently situated at the side of the house (i.e. not a little portable generator), so I could be wrong. Almost everyone in our neighborhood has one because we almost always get one major power outage (3 days or more) each winter. Several years ago we had one that lasted 11 days after a big windstorm. Everyone was eating so much canned soup that all of the local grocery stores ran out of it. :D

Sounds like you have a whole house generator. We have a portable generator we run on gasoline and store in our garage.
 

kendalm7

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We have a wood stove that we use all winter and with oil heating the house but the wood stove is the main thing we use, but with no power it'll be difficult so I'm planing on relying on wood stove and cuddle with blankets and snuggle them together with me and blankets! The hot bath room floor time is a good idea to:) I'm so worried for this winter and my boys:( we always get a least two power outages a winter! :(
 

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