Where People & Piggies Thrive

Newbie or Guinea Guru? Popcorn in!

Register for free to enjoy the full benefits.
Find out more about the NEW, drastically improved site and forum!

Register

In Heat Guinea pigs mating?!

guineapigfairy

Member
Cavy Gazer
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Posts
10
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Messages
10
I have three guinea pigs. A male and two bonded females. My male isn’t neutered yet he will be neutered in january. Because of this i put a cage separator in a big cage i recently got. The girls don’t seem to like him so i thought it would be fine. Whenever i let them all free roam (supervised) the girls snap at him when he comes close. I creeped up to their cage this morning and one of the girls was right beside the cage separator, far from her food, water and bed. and her butt was right beside the separator, not her face. boy was there too. i’m scared they were mating but i’m also surprised because the girl doesn’t like him??? do you think the only reason she pushes him away when i’m there is because i’m watching and she wants to mate in private?? i’m new to guinea pigs so i really don’t know. any advice?!
 

Soecara

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Posts
1,989
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
1,989
Female guinea pigs will reject the advances of males when they are not in heat, when they are in heat they will become much more receptive. Do not put them together for any reason at any time, supervised or not, until four weeks after he is neutered. They don't care if you are watching or not, and if she is in heat it can happen in a second, much faster then you could do anything about.
 

guineapigfairy

Member
Cavy Gazer
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Posts
10
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Messages
10
Female guinea pigs will reject the advances of males when they are not in heat, when they are in heat they will become much more receptive. Do not put them together for any reason at any time, supervised or not, until four weeks after he is neutered. They don't care if you are watching or not, and if she is in heat it can happen in a second, much faster then you could do anything about.
is it a 100% guarantee that a female guinea pig will get pregnant when she mates. ive only had them together for a week. but just in case they’ve already mated. I’ll try and watch them for the next two weeks to see if they display any signs of being in heat.

i’ve put the boar in a smaller cage and he will be there for the next six weeks (2 weeks till neutering appointment and 4 weeks wait time after). But he’s visibly upset by this. Is it possible for him to die from depression or something. idk if it’s worse to leave his cage in the same room as the girls cage or to put him somewhere he can’t see or hear them.

Last question, my girls are about a year old. Just in case they are pregnant, what are the chances of them dying due to birth complications. If i take them to a vet around the time they are due would that guarantee saving their lives?! i don’t want to lose them. I really thought as long as there’s a cage separator and i watch them when they play together that they wouldn’t mate
 

Soecara

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Posts
1,989
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
1,989
If they mate successfully while she is in heat the odd are pretty much 99% she will be pregnant as a result. If there was a cage separator in the way the whole time she was in heat he is unlikely to have been able to mate with her successfully but it is not impossible.

He won't die from not being able to see the girls. If he does get depressed from being on his own the main symptom of this will be he will stop eating and then he will start losing weight. As long as he is still eating he will be ok. If he starts chewing on the bars then I would move him to a different room, if he doesn't chew on the bars I would leave him in the same room as them.

If the girls were to get pregnant the odds are fairly high they will experience some kind of birthing complication, and taking them to a vet may not necessarily save them. There are some things that can go wrong that pretty much guarantee maternal death. For example if they start haemorrhaging post birth there is very little that can be done in time to save them. Things with low odds are saving them is if a pup were to be too big and get stuck the only way to get them out would be a c section, and in guinea pigs that procedure has a very low success rate. However something like a prolapse, or retained placenta, or ongoing moderate bleeding can be fixed by a vet if it is tended to promptly enough and that could save her life.

Taking them prior to a complication happening doesn't really tell you much, the best a vet can do prior to them giving birth is an x-ray once the bones have formed to tell you how many she is expecting. That might tell you whether to expect a pup may get stuck as generally the smaller the litter size the larger the babies will be, so a single baby in an older sow is much more likely to have problems. Aside from that there is no way to tell which guinea pigs are at a higher risk, or what complications to expect until they happen.
 

guineapigfairy

Member
Cavy Gazer
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Posts
10
Joined
Dec 15, 2022
Messages
10
If they mate successfully while she is in heat the odd are pretty much 99% she will be pregnant as a result. If there was a cage separator in the way the whole time she was in heat he is unlikely to have been able to mate with her successfully but it is not impossible.

He won't die from not being able to see the girls. If he does get depressed from being on his own the main symptom of this will be he will stop eating and then he will start losing weight. As long as he is still eating he will be ok. If he starts chewing on the bars then I would move him to a different room, if he doesn't chew on the bars I would leave him in the same room as them.

If the girls were to get pregnant the odds are fairly high they will experience some kind of birthing complication, and taking them to a vet may not necessarily save them. There are some things that can go wrong that pretty much guarantee maternal death. For example if they start haemorrhaging post birth there is very little that can be done in time to save them. Things with low odds are saving them is if a pup were to be too big and get stuck the only way to get them out would be a c section, and in guinea pigs that procedure has a very low success rate. However something like a prolapse, or retained placenta, or ongoing moderate bleeding can be fixed by a vet if it is tended to promptly enough and that could save her life.

Taking them prior to a complication happening doesn't really tell you much, the best a vet can do prior to them giving birth is an x-ray once the bones have formed to tell you how many she is expecting. That might tell you whether to expect a pup may get stuck as generally the smaller the litter size the larger the babies will be, so a single baby in an older sow is much more likely to have problems. Aside from that there is no way to tell which guinea pigs are at a higher risk, or what complications to expect until they happen.
How soon will i know my guinea pig is pregnant if she is?!
 

Soecara

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Posts
1,989
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
1,989
You should be fairly certain by the time she would be six weeks along, keeping track of her weight will help.
 

Anawilliam850

Member
Cavy Gazer
Joined
Dec 29, 2022
Posts
13
Joined
Dec 29, 2022
Messages
13
Clearly they are going to mating so you must be attentive to the birth of the babies
 

Soecara

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Posts
1,989
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
1,989
Clearly they are going to mating so you must be attentive to the birth of the babies
That is simply not true and ignorant to the problems associated with guinea pig pregnancies. They are clearly not going to mate if you simply don't allow un-neutered males any access to un-neutered females at all. Then no mating will happen and no pregnancies will happen.

Pregnancy complications can happen at any stage and it is quite common for you to not be there when a female is actually giving birth as they tend to give birth when it is quiet, like during the middle of the night. Even if you were attentive at the birth problems still happen, and there are plenty of things that can go wrong where you can do nothing to help.
 

Similar threads

salty_cavy
Replies
8
Views
4K
Colorado Cavies
Colorado Cavies
kafaii
Replies
12
Views
3K
foggycreekcavy
foggycreekcavy
kreechurkid
Replies
6
Views
2K
Vanilla eXe
Vanilla eXe
Top