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Classroom Guinea Pig

Res Judicata

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Saw Callie today, she's a beautiful pig. She's mostly white with a ginger colored blaze on her face and black on the left side of it. Her rump is grey, and she has a fur train, but the rest of her is short-haired. And she's the fattest pig I've ever seen. Food full of seeds, but she had a whole bunch of hay in that small cage of hers. Ugh. But it was clean, she has food and water, and her nails are clipped. I offered any assistance and the teacher didn't seem put off by it, so maybe I can help out.
 

Josie's Mom

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Teachers don´t know anything about taking care properly and kids just want to touch the animals, and they get stressed and sad.

This is off-topic, but I feel that generalizations like the above are not only hurtful, but ridiculous. :yuck:
 

Res Judicata

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Ilan says in his class they aren't allowed to touch Callie on their own, and her cage sits over by the teacher's desk. It is locked with one of those zipper-type locks to keep the kids out of the cage. It's not the best situation, but after seeing things I think his teacher is doing the best she can and knows how to with a pig that another teacher gave up.
 

PiggieMamaKelly

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I think in theory having classroom pets can be a great idea. But it seems it is almost never executed properly. As a kid we had a class rat that we all took turns taking home for the weekend. Can you even imagine what that poor rat must have been through??
 

Res Judicata

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Callie has hay, but won't eat it. I'm figuring she's never seen the stuff before. Any ideas on how to get a lone pig to try hay, or is she just going to have to figure it out on her own? I wish I could just bring her home. I think she'd be so much happier with a friend or two. And my pigs could teach her a thing or two.
 

NewPiggyLover

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I don´t agree with these animals at school. Teachers don´t know anything about taking care properly and kids just want to touch the animals, and they get stressed and sad.

Please don't generalize, some of us teachers DO know how to properly take care of guinea pigs. That being said, I now keep my piggies at home and not at school. To state that "teachers don't know anything about taking care properly" is inaccurate and offensive. Taking care of cavies and being a teacher have nothing to do with each other - some teachers know, some don't. It would be like making a statement that "doctors don't know anything about baseball". One's profession does not define one's knowledge and experience.
 

ktgoodaim

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Please don't generalize, some of us teachers DO know how to properly take care of guinea pigs...To state that "teachers don't know anything about taking care properly" is inaccurate and offensive. Taking care of cavies and being a teacher have nothing to do with each other - some teachers know, some don't. It would be like making a statement that "doctors don't know anything about baseball". One's profession does not define one's knowledge and experience.

Thank you for that. I took great offense to nDanix's slur. I have seen where classroom pets ARE successful and everyone (animals included) have come out winners. Aren't piggies supposed to be social animals? Why not a better social environment than with lots of people who unconditionally love it? Well ok...they aren't supposed to be solitary...so make it more if possible. With the teacher educated about the animal and classroom limits set (and children who are mature enough to handle such an animal), I don't understand what is the problem. Maybe my classroom management and expectations are so different that others 'assume' are in place in a classroom. I am viewing this with my current class (and my 13 previous) and can see how this could be a viable and beneficial addition to our class. Never before have I wanted to have a classroom pet, but now that I have one at home, I can't help but think, "What would things be like if I had one (or more) at school?"

Now, I will admit I am a very fresh newbie, and I wholeheartedly agree that if it is not well thought out and planned, a classroom pet is disastrous for all involved and should never be a 'Oh, that's such a cute idea!' kind of thing. However, I really am puzzled and taken aback at such an outpouring of distain to such an ideal situation to teach hands on, real world responsibility that so many students are lacking now.
 

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