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Fleece Cage Liner make-up

karalianne

Well-known Member
Cavy Slave
Joined
Jul 30, 2005
Messages
40
Okay, this is maybe going to sound a little weird, but bear with me.

I use cloth pads for my period, and they are basically the same idea as cage liners, except the composition is somewhat different.

For a pad, the layer nearest the body is cotton, flannel, or microfibre. Then there's an absorbent layer, usually terry of some kind. The final layer is a waterproof layer to protect the clothes, sometimes made of PUL (plastic-coated fabric) and sometimes made of fleece (mine are all backed with fleece as it's more breathable).

The reason for this order, as far as I can determine, is to keep the flow directed away from the body.

So, anyone want to explain just why cage liners are done "backwards"? I get the whole wicking away aspect, I'm just curious what others think about the difference between a cloth pad and a cage liner. (I'm pretty sure cloth diapers are also made the same way as cloth pads, too.)

Oh, and I use fleece - a couple of layers of towels topped with fleece blankets. This is more for my own edification and understanding than to help me make up my mind! :)
 
Not a weird question at all. I cloth diapered my babies. :) And sewed diapers.

Fleece isn't very absorbant itself, so it can work as a stay dry layer. Fleece used for cloth diapers and pads is typically a different kind then you'll find at Joanns, for example, and works better to hold moisture IN than most fleeces.

A cage liner uses fleece that's been stripped of any waterproofness it may have had combined with an absorbant layer of fabric underneath to draw liquid through the fleece. Because fleece doesn't hold liquid on it's own, it feels relatively dry under piggies feet.


In cloth diapering fleece liners are often used the same way. They're put inside the diaper to keep baby feeling drier. You'll also find diapers with a fleece outer (often microfleece) that's the "waterproof" layer. The idea being that fleece won't let liquid through unless something is pulling it through, like an absorbant fabric. It all works up to a certain point; a soaked diaper will leak eventually no matter what it's made of. Too bad coroplast is so stiff...
 
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