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Adopt vs. Buy "But I consider him a rescue!"

Wildcavy

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By acceptance I meant accept that they have made a mistake or did not research enough, etc. No one is perfect and most of the well-educated people on this forum started somewhere. However, the post IS brainwashing; repeating the same thing over and over with no real purpose. The above post isn't really exposing any secrets. Nothing about animals being killed on spot because of abnormalities, animals being shipped away to be tested on, animals being killed by even Pet Store employees because they won't sell, or even how many animals in a row were thrown out before your breed had the perfect color fur. Telling people they aren't actually rescuing an animal if they buy it from a breeder or seller is a waste of breath, but telling people why they should consider going to a Rescue could be the better option for them and the brutal truth of animal mass production isn't.

There's a difference between someone doing a passionate, if not entirely detailed, editorial / column / exposition, and brainwashing. Not that we should go too far afield in semantics, because it (ahem) dilutes the point of this entire conversation / thread.
 

Amalee

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There's a difference between someone doing a passionate, if not entirely detailed, editorial / column / exposition, and brainwashing. Not that we should go too far afield in semantics, because it (ahem) dilutes the point of this entire conversation / thread.

Well, in my book, brainwashing is repeating something sternly with no real purpose other than "I'm right and you're wrong." The column comes off to me that way, the person that wrote it feels very strongly about the topic and I think they'd be offended by anyone that thinks otherwise. Trying to use condescending comments, education and morality against a person to scare them or guilt them into thinking their way. I honestly do not think this is the way to get Pet Stores "out of business."
 

clb89

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Personally I thought it was a very passionately written article. It does present some facts of what happens when you buy from a petstore and/or breeder. It brings a nice strong, positive message for rescues. Unfortunately, I do believe there will always be someone who buys pets from a pet store. Overall I really liked this article, the voice of the writer is clear and powerful.
 
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Felixitous

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I think my only problem with this is--I work at a local pet store that is primarily rescues. We work with the local shelters to re-home animals from rescues. We actually have two guinea pig boars here that are from the shelter, as well as a hedgehog and two chinchillas, and that's just the rescues we have at the moment. Pet stores aren't inherently evil. The bigger ones might be (like Petco and Petsmart), but the little ones tend to actually care about the animals in their care and do their best to ensure they are healthy and go to good homes. I agree that calling an animal a rescue when it clearly isn't is stupid, but the kind of people who do that are also the kind of people who wouldn't really consider where their animal is coming from in the first place.
 

Jenny Liddle

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So, I'm new here and I really don't want to start off on the wrong foot, but I have to agree with Amalee about the tone of the piece. Yes, pet shops selling animals are terrible and even when animals are "properly cared for" according to their standards we know they aren't. But again, it's much better to help people understand than just condemn and dismiss them out of hand.

For example, our story.... We had been wanting to get a family pet for a while, discussed our options, and decided on a small one like a guinea pig or maybe a rat, etc. We were actually looking for a certain piece of furniture in the Free section of Craigslist and saw a posting for free guinea pigs. There were four crowded into one tiny cage in the attached pic. We made the decision to try to rescue one of these poor creatures even though we couldn't take them all home as we would have wanted. Princess Pretty Sparkle, the Queen of Love (as she was dubbed by the 4 yr old) was absolutely filthy, terrified, and covered in mites. I don't think she had ever seen real veggies before she came to our home. I absolutely consider her a rescue! Admittedly, I didn't fully understand her space requirements and bought her the largest pet store cage I could find in our small town (it's tiny compared to posted standards here, but we are in the process of designing/building something better for her), but I still think she is better off with us.

To condescend to people who consider their animal a rescue is demoralizing and frankly the assertion that "the end doesn't justify the means" in regard to any animal in need finding a home sounds awfully utilitarian to me.
 

lissie

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For example, our story.... We had been wanting to get a family pet for a while, discussed our options, and decided on a small one like a guinea pig or maybe a rat, etc. We were actually looking for a certain piece of furniture in the Free section of Craigslist and saw a posting for free guinea pigs. There were four crowded into one tiny cage in the attached pic. We made the decision to try to rescue one of these poor creatures even though we couldn't take them all home as we would have wanted. Princess Pretty Sparkle, the Queen of Love (as she was dubbed by the 4 yr old) was absolutely filthy, terrified, and covered in mites. I don't think she had ever seen real veggies before she came to our home. I absolutely consider her a rescue! Admittedly, I didn't fully understand her space requirements and bought her the largest pet store cage I could find in our small town (it's tiny compared to posted standards here, but we are in the process of designing/building something better for her), but I still think she is better off with us.

In your case, she's considered a rescue. Rescuing the animal from a neglectful owner is actually better than adopting from rescues or shelters. You've saved her before she ends up in the shelter.

It's the buying from pet store and breeder that we don't support. Some people buy from pet store and say they've "rescued" their pig from the pet store. What they did was actually funding the pet store to add more pigs to their merchandise.
 

CavySpirit

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My point is that if I can dilute a topic to the point where a Rescue volunteer is similar to someone buying from a Pet Store, then a long-time Pet Store buyer could easily do so as well. The focus needs to be shifted, from morality to reality.

HUH? I have no idea what your point is. Please give me an example of a conversation or a discussion.
 

Amalee

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HUH? I have no idea what your point is. Please give me an example of a conversation or a discussion.
If I can say "hey, someone that runs a rescue isn't all that different from someone that buys from a pet store, both people are trying to help an animal in need," then a person that is buying from a pet store won't see much difference either and continue to buy from the pet store. The article doesn't speak to newbies that aren't well educated on the topic, it speaks to those of us that are already educated and angry about people still buying from pet stores.
 

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I don't think anyone here needs to be told how pet shops and mills need to be put out of business, but I think this article should have focused on the need for animals to be rescued, more than demonizing people for calling their pet a rescue. It reminds me of the people saying, "Anyone who feeds their dog Ol' Roy is a terrible person and a disgrace." Why not just explain to people what makes a healthy dog food? Why not just help them understand why the food isn't healthy instead of angling your focus on making them feel evil? Call out the dog food companies selling the dreadful food instead of insulting the misinformed people buying the food. I'm all for showing people documentaries about the lives of dogs in puppymills (I've made people NEVER go back to a pet store with those, because it's effective for them to see the suffering - not to be called names). People need to see the way those dogs live, and to see the happy endings of animals who are rescued from those situations. That is what is going to make people go to rescues instead of pet stores. Not insulting them.
 

CavySpirit

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I don't think anyone here needs to be told how pet shops and mills need to be put out of business, but I think this article should have focused on the need for animals to be rescued, more than demonizing people for calling their pet a rescue. It reminds me of the people saying, "Anyone who feeds their dog Ol' Roy is a terrible person and a disgrace." Why not just explain to people what makes a healthy dog food? Why not just help them understand why the food isn't healthy instead of angling your focus on making them feel evil? Call out the dog food companies selling the dreadful food instead of insulting the misinformed people buying the food. I'm all for showing people documentaries about the lives of dogs in puppymills (I've made people NEVER go back to a pet store with those, because it's effective for them to see the suffering - not to be called names). People need to see the way those dogs live, and to see the happy endings of animals who are rescued from those situations. That is what is going to make people go to rescues instead of pet stores. Not insulting them.

I'm not talking about insulting people, BUT quite a few people need some tough love when it comes to getting them to remove their rose-colored glasses when it comes to breeders and pet stores. MANY MANY people REFUSE to take any responsibility whatsoever about getting their dogs/cats from breeders or their pigs from pet stores. The vast majority of people (especially with cats and dogs) know full-well they could have/should have adopted. They chose not to for their own rationalizations. And they like to hang on to those rationalizations--even in the face of facts.

The article was not about the NEED for rescues. So, why bring it up? It's about the rationalizations that people make to feel good about their poor decisions and actions. Decisions and actions that kill other animals.

Calling a purchased pet a rescue undermines, belittles and insults every rescue in the country. And until you've been bled dry as a rescuer, I guess it's a little hard to appreciate.

And to reiterate Lissie's point, private rehoming adoptions CAN be considered a rescue. Obtaining a pet from a breeder or pet store for any price, including free, is NOT rescuing.
 

ShihTzuLover

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@CavySpirit Showing people the reality of puppymills is tough love, and is more effective than any harsh words I can deliver to them myself, and if THAT doesn't make them change nothing will. If seeing where their new Pomeranian puppy came from doesn't change their minds, how is anything I SAY going to? That was my only point. I also never said the article was about the need for rescues (which did not mean the need for MORE rescues but for more rescues of animals rather than purchases), that was clear in my post. I said the article should have been about that and about educating people in ways that will actually make them listen if they have the capacity to do so at all - instead of being condescending without even showing any of the realities of puppymills. Images speak thousands of words this article can't even really touch. You are unnecessarily rude to people who are on the same side as you. I only ever rescue my animals, I just don't agree that being rude and condescending to people is going to educate them more effectively than showing them the truth in other ways.

"And until you've been bled dry as a rescuer, I guess it's a little hard to appreciate." That was a very rude, high and mighty statement, in my opinion. You know nothing about me, or if I've been involved in rescue or not. I have. I know full well that calling a purchased animal a rescue is wrong, but it is NOT the big issue when it comes to suffering animals. What people say about an animal they bought isn't the important issue - because as you put it, they will continue buying them regardless in many cases. Teaching someone not to call their purchased dog a rescue is not as critical as showing them where the dog came from in the hopes that it will terrify and hurt them enough to never do it again. This is just a petty issue in the larger scheme of things. The big issue is actually spreading the word in an educational way that shows the suffering of these animals. Picking and pulling at words people use is not really solving anything.

I have changed people's minds without being condescending, and simply by showing what the reality is behind those pet store windows. I wasn't focused on the fact that they called their dog a rescue. I was focused on getting them to see the truth.
 

CavySpirit

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@CavySpirit Showing people the reality of puppymills is tough love, and is more effective than any harsh words I can deliver to them myself, and if THAT doesn't make them change nothing will.

I don't know who you are talking to IRL that will sit down and watch a video on puppy mills. I'm talking about casual conversations with people in real life. Most people are already well aware that puppy mills are bad.

In fact, because I field a LOT of customer phone calls for our cages and guinea pig phone calls all day long, I frequently get to talk to people who are ready to "buy" a guinea pig and are making their cage purchase ahead of time. I have found that THE BEST WAY to get them to appreciate and understand in a positive way that going to a pet store to buy a guinea pig isn't right goes something like this: "you know, I know you wouldn't even consider buying a puppy from a pet store because of the horrors of puppy mills. If you think puppy mills are bad, guinea pig and small pet mills are far, far worse. They are truly horrific. Where do you live? Oh, {I add my recommendations of rescues or such in their area, or online resources to adopt}." I never have to educate anyone on the issues of puppy mills. People already know about it.

And I'm sorry, but the words make the perception. It IS about the words. It is how people think about things. It's about more than stopping the suffering of the one.

If you can get someone to not get a ShihTzu from a breeder by watching a puppymill video, good on you, but, the vast majority of dog and cat breed-specific lovers out there are very, very defensive about how they HAD to get their perfect, healthy, friendly ShihTzu from a great breeder they know. It's not that they don't know about puppy mills. They know. They just don't care and don't think it applies to them as they didn't get their dog from a puppy mill or pet store. Same issue though. They don't understand the big picture.

What people say about an animal they bought isn't the important issue...
And I think it darn well IS important what they say about it. That's my whole point and the OP's point. It's what they say to other people that perpetuates the problem and erroneous socialization continues.
 

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I love the OP. I see the logic in that post (that pets in pet stores kept in poor conditions justify the purchase of that pet) used way too often in life and even on these forums! I hope anyone who has used that logic can re-evaluate their position and make a different judgement next time. Yes, this means leaving that pet in the store to suffer. But it means saving many animals in the future! Rescues all the way <3
 

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There's really nothing more I can say on this issue, obviously. You're not going to see my point. Why does this article have more merit than the people actually making documentaries EXPOSING THE TRUTH? In your opinion, everyone already knows about puppymills? Then what's the point of trying to talk about it to them at all? You're not going to get someone to stop calling their dog a rescue, and you're not going to change their minds about getting dogs from pet stores if they already know they come from puppymills. So this conversation really has no point at all.
 

Wildcavy

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I think there was value in this column for two reasons: one, it got us all talking about the issue. But also because it was something of a rallying call or challenge to all of us who rescue, from a breeder no less, who acknowledges that even her well-loved pigs cannot be called rescues.

I don't really consider the column to be an article but rather an opinion piece or just a column stating a position, mean to get folks to think about the issue (in a provocative manner). I don't regard it as an exposition or article meant to explore all of the different angles or reasons in a "rescue" vs "breeder" situation. The column reminded me somewhat of what speakers used to do at the rallies I would attend when I was younger. And even if the column writer isn't someone who "gets it right" or writes silly things in other media, there is still value in raising the issue. Even a stopped clock is right twice a day, and I'm not going to dismiss everything someone says simply because I disagree with them frequently in other matters.
 

mufasa

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Interesting topic. I'm about as anti-breeder and as anti-pet store as they come, considering that my first piggy, Mufasa, was the classic "buy a sick pig and have it die almost immediately" case. I promptly declared that I never, ever, ever would get a guinea pig from a pet store again. God has a sense of humor and likes to make me eat my words. My Quinn came from Petco, but it was a case of someone dumping her off there because they didn't want her. Petco made no money from the deal as their "adoption fee" was a direct donation to their spay/neuter fund. I consider her a rescue for two reasons: 1) she was dumped by someone who didn't want her, who might have taken her to a rescue if they weren't too lazy to find one, and at least she didn't take up valuable rescue space before I got her; 2) Petco didn't benefit financially in any way from the transaction. They even threw in a free pigloo because they felt bad for her in her barren aquarium.

It can be argued that if pet stores didn't sell pigs in the first place, Quinn wouldn't have been in that situation, and that Petco was simply helping to remedy the bad situation that it helped create in the first place. Supposedly the people said they got her at a different pet store that wouldn't take her back, but that doesn't matter in the long run, since Petco sells piggies, too. But I feel no compunction about calling Quinn a rescue because of the two aforementioned points. Others might not agree, but that's fine because the world isn't black and white and I'm comfortable with my decision.
 

cavykaitlyn

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I think it is safe to say that my Delilah is a rescue.
My sister bought her (here I cringed) at Petco a few years ago (2) and I was SO jealous. I was also poorly educated. I didn't know at the time that everything my sister was doing was so horribly wrong.

She never cut Deli's nails, and her cage was always filthy. Water used to be a sometimes thing, but she got better at it. She fed her food with seeds in it. No veggies unless i gave them to her. This was all while I begged her to fix things for the sake of the animal I loved. I had just joined the forum at the time, and I knew that it was neglect, what she was doing. When Deli accidentally pooped in the tipped over pigloo, that was it. It either sat there or was taken out. It gets cold in the basement. She needed the warmth. But gimme a sec, my sister's room is in the basement. She wasn't leaving her down there alone.

So on June 18th 2013 at around 6 pm, Deli became my own little piggy. I conducted an introduction ceremony and they've been wheeking together ever since :)

I consider her a rescue because I rescued her from an unfavorable situation. She was originally from a pet store, but most pigs that come into rescues are. The cycle was already broken. I'm proud of what I did. I don't need anyone to tell me I shouldn't be :cool:
 

Amalee

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Looking back at the column I can say it makes much more sense to me that only an animal that was not immediately replaced by another animal should be called a "rescue." When a Shelter adopts a dog out, they do not hurry to get another dog, opposed to a pet store. However, most people can not and will not settle for the idea that leaving a suffering animal would be for the greater good, and it most definitely takes a strong person in either case (buying it or leaving it there.) However at this point I think I would argue that it takes a stronger person to feel the aches of abandonment and obligation to these poor creatures but turning away. It is so sad how tormented we Guinea Pig lovers are and the amazing but sometimes painful things we have to do for animals, but it is nothing compared to the pain thousands of animals have to go through. :(

The anger about calling some animals "rescues" does make more sense to me now, but I still think that educating others on animal abuse and mass production should be kept to extreme images, video, solid information and no rudeness/condescension.
 

2198lindsey

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[MENTION=27133]Amalee[/MENTION] The point is not the people who don't know, and call them rescues out of ignorance.

The whole point is the people who try to make excuses for buying vs. rescuing while understanding why they shouldn', and then try to call them rescues.

It's frustrating because I think people often want the praise, or want to feel good themselves like they are adopting or rescuing, without going through the actual work​ of rescuing or adopting.
 

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[MENTION=25452]2198lindsey[/MENTION]

**It's frustrating because I think people often want the praise, or want to feel good themselves like they are adopting or rescuing, without going through the actual work​ of rescuing or adopting.**

Bingo
 
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