Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

  1. #1
    Cavy Slave
    Joined
    Jul 11, 2018
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    0 Rec'd/0 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Quoted
    2 Post(s)

    Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Hello everybody. We've been to the vet, and they've asked us to get Orchard Grass Hay for our guinea pigs. Does anybody know the pros / cons of this compared to timothy hay?

  2. #2
    Cavy Slave MaiaBex's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 09, 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, Indiana
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    7
    Thanks
    3 Rec'd/3 Posts
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    I don't know about pros/cons... Orchard grass hay is a bit sweeter and softer than timothy hay. My pig likes it as a forage at bedtime just for the variety.

    Did your vet say why you should get orchard grass hay? And was it instead of or in addition to timothy hay?

  3. #3
    Administrator bpatters's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 23, 2009
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    28,356
    Thanks
    168
    Thanks
    7,179 Rec'd/5,716 Posts
    Mentioned
    2017 Post(s)
    Quoted
    3753 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Any grass hay (timothy, orchard, meadow, blue, brome) is suitable for guinea pigs, although brome is lower quality than the others. I can't imaging why they'd suggest orchard over timothy.

    Timothy is usually more plentiful, therefore cheaper. But if you're going to be allergic to a hay, it will probably be timothy. Most of the people I know who use orchard or meadow exclusively do so because someone in the house is allergic to timothy.

  4. #4
    Cavy Slave ItsaZoo's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 08, 2018
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    18 Rec'd/18 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Quoted
    20 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    The nutritional makeup is almost the same. I have noticed that not only is orchard grass a little softer, but the strands are longer. I buy the blended Timothy and orchard and there seems to be less waste than Timothy alone.

  5. #5
    Cavy Slave
    Joined
    Jul 11, 2018
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    0 Rec'd/0 Posts
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Quoted
    2 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Our vet recommended this for our guinea pig who is showing blood in her urine. We have her medical thread on our profile, but I do trust her as she is an experienced exotic vet.

  6. #6
    Cavy Slave ItsaZoo's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 08, 2018
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    18 Rec'd/18 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Quoted
    20 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Depending on the cutting, orchard grass can be a little lower in calcium than Timothy. Blood in the urine could indicate stones, so that may be the reason for the orchard grass recommendation.

  7. #7
    Cavy Slave spy9doc's Avatar
    Joined
    Oct 09, 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    5,477
    Thanks
    71
    Thanks
    1,529 Rec'd/1,260 Posts
    Mentioned
    578 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1132 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Quote Originally Posted by ItsaZoo View Post
    Depending on the cutting, orchard grass can be a little lower in calcium than Timothy.
    I'd be curious to know the source of your information. Any references? Not challenging, just asking.

  8. #8
    Cavy Slave ItsaZoo's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 08, 2018
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    18 Rec'd/18 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Quoted
    20 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    https://wheeklyreader.wordpress.com/...r-guinea-pigs/

    Here is a link to the article I found regarding orchard grass and timothy. It sounds like the calcium differences are small and based on the cutting. I also saw on the Oxbow page that orchard grass was softer which made it ideal for smaller pets including guinea pigs.

  9. #9
    Cavy Slave ItsaZoo's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 08, 2018
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    18 Rec'd/18 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Quoted
    20 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    I almost didn’t find this link again, but Oklahoma Coop Extension had nutrition percentages for different grass hay. They list orchard grass having .27% calcium and .34% phosphorus compared to timothy having .48% calcium and .23% phosphorus.

    http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-10734/ANSI-3934web.pdf

  10. "Thank you, ItsaZoo, for this useful post," says:


  11. #10
    Administrator bpatters's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 23, 2009
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    28,356
    Thanks
    168
    Thanks
    7,179 Rec'd/5,716 Posts
    Mentioned
    2017 Post(s)
    Quoted
    3753 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    I think it's also true that the amount of minerals in any hay varies with the cutting. I can't remember whether the younger hay has the most or the least, though.

  12. #11
    Cavy Slave spy9doc's Avatar
    Joined
    Oct 09, 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    5,477
    Thanks
    71
    Thanks
    1,529 Rec'd/1,260 Posts
    Mentioned
    578 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1132 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Quote Originally Posted by ItsaZoo View Post
    I almost didnít find this link again, but Oklahoma Coop Extension had nutrition percentages for different grass hay.
    Great article! Thanks for posting the link. As a professor of biology and A&P, I always find it interesting to see how human and animal physiology are often comparable. What applies to one often correlates with the other.

    For instance, the article states, "Nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism - bone disease caused by too much P and not enough Ca. Calcium is removed from the bone, which can result in brittle, weak bones." In class, we often talk about the fact that we are raising a generation of osteoporotic young women because of their consumption of sodas/cola. Cola has a high percentage of phosphorous (phosphoric acid) that tends to cause the calcium to be leached out of their bones, setting them up for future osteoporosis. Of course, we now know that drinking soda is bad for us at any age!

  13. #12
    Cavy Slave ItsaZoo's Avatar
    Joined
    Sep 08, 2018
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    1
    Thanks
    18 Rec'd/18 Posts
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Quoted
    20 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    With your biology expertise you gleaned a lot more from that article than I did! I have read about the phosphorus in sodas and calcium loss in bones and teeth. I have in-laws with dentures due to bone and tooth loss from constant soda consumption.

    I stopped drinking pop more than 20 years ago. I was a real fan of Diet Coke and Tab. When my dad was diagnosed with dementia, there were studies being done regarding aluminum levels in the brain and memory loss. My dad was a pop drinker and it was suggested that aluminum in cans and cookware leached into foods we eat. That was enough for me and I quit drinking the stuff. Further research never really found solid evidence that there was any cause and effect, but I was out of the habit by then.

  14. #13
    Cavy Slave spy9doc's Avatar
    Joined
    Oct 09, 2011
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    5,477
    Thanks
    71
    Thanks
    1,529 Rec'd/1,260 Posts
    Mentioned
    578 Post(s)
    Quoted
    1132 Post(s)

    Re: Advice on Orchard Grass Hay

    Quote Originally Posted by ItsaZoo View Post
    With your biology expertise you gleaned a lot more from that article than I did!
    Not necessarily more, just different information. I was happy to see the stats on the Ca content of various hays. Good looking out!

User Tag List

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •