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Thread: Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with teeth?

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    Cavy Slave
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    Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with teeth?

    My Guinea has started to bite a bit more than his normal affectionate nibbles and I'm worried he might be unhappy or unwell rather then his natural Guinea pig jumpiness. He is very comfortable around me but will bite my fingers from his cubby if he particularly doesn't want to be picked up. Of course Guinea's aren't always in the mood for a pat or cuddle but I'd like to teach him to not bite so hard if he's feeling like some alone time.

    He has also started tugging on my shirt with his teeth while we're having cuddles and he's more then happy to sit with me for a pat whiles he's doing this so I assumed it was an affectionate thing but since I'm a bit worried about his other biting behaviours I thought this could be related somehow.

    Another worry is he sometimes has his food in a small glass bowl and drags the bowl into his cubbys with his teeth (however in a somewhat gentle way) that I don't know how much damage to his teeth this could potentially be doing..

    I'm quite positive it's not a problem of overgrown teeth but have still arranged an appointment to get him looked at, until he gets checked I was just hoping there might be some advice or tips about this please! He is a very well looked after Guinea so I'm also wondering if it's just his way of learning behaviours as he's growing and maturing also?

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    Cavy Champion Guinea Pig Papa's Avatar
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    Re: Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with te

    In my experiences, other than the bite when you're trying to pick him up, it's all normal.

    Before Pooper passed away, when he was out for cuddle time, his signal that he wanted to go home was biting and tugging my shirt. Consequently to this day I have many "Poopy shirts" with tiny bite holes in them that I can never bring myself to get rid of. I wear them all to this day.

    My elderly boar, Sly, has ALWAYS dragged his glass bowl around the cage with his teeth, and even tugs it under his pigloo when he wants to "eat in". Again, it's never been an issue.

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    Administrator bpatters's Avatar
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    Re: Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with te

    I doubt seriously that there's anything wrong with his teeth.

    It's very common for pigs to nibble on you or your clothes when they want to go back to the cage. Often they have to pee, and want to get back to the cage to do it.

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    Re: Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with te

    Thankyou for the feedback

    I'm very sad to hear about poor Poopy

    Is there any known tricks for teaching guniea's to not bite so hard? (Unless of course they're in real danger)

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    Administrator bpatters's Avatar
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    Re: Biting - still learning the difference between a bite and nibble? Tugging with te

    Move them, or yourself, so they can't bite you. Sharply tell them no, but don't hit them, flick their noses, etc. It takes patience, but it can be done.

    But do put them back in the cage when they start to nibble.

  6. "Thank you, bpatters, for this useful post," says:


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