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Thread: Guinea pigs acting up

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    Guinea pigs acting up

    So, I'm here on behalf of a friend of mine who owns a pair of guinea pigs. His oldest guinea pig has been acting up destroying things and squeaking a lot ever since he moved into his new house. This got worse after he got his second guinea pig, and he had to separate them. The younger one was acting up until separated from the older one, but seems terrified of my friend or his girlfriend. Does anyone know anything about why they are doing this? It's gotten to be a serious problem as the young one is jumping of couches and climbing his stairs, and the older one is tearing up anything she can, wires, shoes, the carpet, the wall plaster.

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    Administrator lissie's Avatar
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    Re: Guinea pigs acting up

    Are they free range? Can your friend cage them? Does he feed them unlimited hay?

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    Re: Guinea pigs acting up

    He keeps them caged most of the time, but lets them out to play 3 times a week. He just feeds them pellet's apparently.

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    Re: Guinea pigs acting up

    The diet may very well be a big part of the problem, the diet they are currently on could be making them irritable, isn't satisfying their natural need to chew, and is putting them at a high risk of developing health issues.

    Guinea pigs are hard wired to eat 24/7. They need to eat pretty much constantly to keep their digestive systems moving. However at least 80% of their diet should be grass hay. The grass hay is very high in fibre and it is necessary for proper digestive health. The grass hay also contains silicates, and requires a great deal of chewing, which is what keeps a guinea pigs constantly growing teeth ground down. Without an essentially unlimited amount of hay the guinea pigs are at a big risk of developing digestive issues and overgrown teeth. There are a few different kinds of grass hay that you can feed guinea pigs, the most common in the US is Timothy, but some people are allergic to Timothy so other grass hays such as bluegrass or orchardgrass are good alternatives.

    They also do need some vegetables, roughly 1 cup of vegetables per guinea pig per day is what is recommended. Vegetables that are good to feed daily are, red/green leaf lettuce, bell peppers, a small amount of carrot, zucchini, and a small amount of tomato. Bell peppers are by far one of the most important vegetables you can feed, they are high in vitamin C but also low in calcium, as guinea pigs need a source of vitamin C in the diet to prevent them developing scurvy.

    Edit to add: It is also important to note buying small bags of hay from pet stores is by far the most expensive way to get hay, it is cheaper to buy hay in bulk either in full bales or flakes from a local source (from a farmer or fodder store) or large box fulls from online (small pet select, KMS hayloft etc.).
    Last edited by Soecara; 10-16-16 at 12:39 am.

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