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View Full Version : Neutering/Spaying Should I neuter?



mommykingx3
10-23-12, 04:59 pm
Are there any complications to neutering?
Will he have to take antibiotics?
Should I even bother and just get him a friend instead of putting him with my female?
ect. Any advice to help us make this decision?!

diagoNfriend
10-23-12, 06:02 pm
from what i have seen, a lot of people air on caution from complications that can come later on and during recovery. here are some links to give you some more info. hope they help http://www.guinealynx.info/postop.html
Guinea Pig Neutering, How to Neuter your Guinea Pigs (http://www.cavyspirit.com/neutering.htm)

good luck.

Nix16
10-23-12, 06:11 pm
Depends on age of piggy, health etc as to what the risk is. I got a male from the rspca and had to get him neutered (that's their policy) but as it turned out he was much older than he appeared and died coming out of the anaesthetic, so yes there is risk of complications but really you have to weigh up your options, talk to your vet, then make a decision. Good luck figuring it out.

diagoNfriend
10-23-12, 06:17 pm
Depends on age of piggy, health etc as to what the risk is. I got a male from the rspca and had to get him neutered (that's their policy) but as it turned out he was much older than he appeared and died coming out of the anaesthetic, so yes there is risk of complications but really you have to weigh up your options, talk to your vet, then make a decision. Good luck figuring it out.

that is a HORRIBLE policy to have when it comes to small animals. the risk is SO much higher with them. i understand they want to keep pet population down but they should be thinking of the risks involved with an animal and increased age is ALWAYS a factor when it comes to being put under. even for humans. that seems like it was HIGHLY unnecessary. i am so sorry that he passed.

mommykingx3
10-24-12, 12:55 pm
Thanks guys. I really don't think I am going to do it. I will just make him a per infant cage and get him a buddie. It seems silly to risk his life just so I can put him with the girls. I didn't really want another cage, but he didn't ask to be abandoned either. He is so darling. I hope he cheers up when he gets a nice big cage and a house mate.

Paula
10-24-12, 01:09 pm
I've had many successful neuters (and spays). It depends a great deal on the anesthetic used and the competence and experience of the vet, in addition to the age and overall health of the animal.

madelineelaine
10-24-12, 01:13 pm
What will you do with your female then?

and I don't ever recommend neutering, it such a delicate procedure for such little bodies. They had to shave most of felix for his surgery, and I could so the iv marks after and I felt awful.

Plus forcing pain meds, antibiotics and then ultimately syringe feeding him made me feel like an animal torturer.

Paula
10-24-12, 01:19 pm
What will you do with your female then?

and I don't ever recommend neutering, it such a delicate procedure for such little bodies. They had to shave most of felix for his surgery, and I could so the iv marks after and I felt awful.

Plus forcing pain meds, antibiotics and then ultimately syringe feeding him made me feel like an animal torturer.A typical neuter should not involve any of the things you mentioned. I will say again that the competence of the vet performing the surgery is key.

Ash-Ro060708
10-24-12, 01:21 pm
What will you do with your female then?


It seems silly to risk his life just so I can put him with the girls.

The OP says girls... so I'm guessing there is already more then one.

madelineelaine
10-24-12, 01:36 pm
A typical neuter should not involve any of the things you mentioned. I will say again that the competence of the vet performing the surgery is key.

Technically it was a hernia repair, as a result of a neuter. Which is why the idea of neutering when it isn't necessary is something I don't agree with.

The competence probably had something to do with it. My vet is cavy savy, she has guinea pigs herself and she has done many neuters. She had never done a hernia on a guinea pig before though.

Paula
10-24-12, 01:49 pm
Technically it was a hernia repair, as a result of a neuter. Which is why the idea of neutering when it isn't necessary is something I don't agree with.

The competence probably had something to do with it. My vet is cavy savy, she has guinea pigs herself and she has done many neuters. She had never done a hernia on a guinea pig before though.I recall and must say the delay in the time it took between your discovering the hernia and actually getting him in likely contributed to the complexity and complications.

Realistically, neutering is a surgery and like any other carries complications and risks. Those can be minimized by the things I've mentioned and attentive after care and prompt attention to oddities or issues that may crop up after surgery.

madelineelaine
10-24-12, 02:06 pm
Yes, well given the circumstances at the time we did the best with what we could and got him in as soon as we got back from vacation, and then the surgery had to be booked which meant more time.

There is always a risk, but why take it if it isn't necessary.

Lovecraft
10-24-12, 02:26 pm
I'm gonna chime in to mention one other factor about neutering that nobody else has mentioned: it can be very expensive. You may get lucky and find an experienced, skilled vet who will do the surgery for a low cost...but you also may wind up paying up to $300, plus the costs of any medications given. Costs vary from vet to vet, city to city and you definitely shouldn't choose a less experienced vet just because they're cheaper. If you have to shop around for the lowest bidder, neutering is probably a bad idea.

If it was me...I'd put that money into my emergency vet fund instead and simply get same-sex buddies for the male and female. I personally wouldn't spend a large amount of money on an avoidable surgery because I just don't have those kinds of funds. The money I'd spend neutering is money I wouldn't be able to spend on a genuine emergency.

Nix16
10-24-12, 02:34 pm
It also depends if you have the capacity to take another piggy and if you can cope with 5+ years of cleaning 2 cages. You don't have to decide anything right away, just have a serious think about what you want long term. I think it's a personal decision, and while Lovecraft makes a good point, I suspect you would spend more than the cost of a neuter on getting and caring for another pig anyway.

Paula
10-24-12, 02:38 pm
Cost is a good point. The vet I see for complex things charges $200+ for alterations but there is also a vet near me that has a spay/neuter clinic and they only charge $60 per animal so it's been easier on my wallet for my recent spays and neuters. If it's a possibility that you might have to choose between an elective surgery versus having a good vet fund built up for emergencies, opt for the latter, always.

mufasa
10-24-12, 03:34 pm
I was going to get Borat neutered so he could live with Amy. Sadly, he had to be put to sleep because of genetic problems, but if he'd lived, I'd have gone ahead with the surgery because they got along (lived next door and had a divided playpen) so I wanted them to be able to be together.

However, I made that decision because I don't really have the room for four pigs. I ended up with a boar and sow because of missexing; otherwise, I would simply have had two same-sex pigs, which was the original intent.

mommykingx3
10-24-12, 09:52 pm
Ok thanks everyone. But her is an update. Bernie is quite depressed but tomorrow I am getting two more males and they are getting a large cage for them. I feel neutering just so I don't have two cages is selfish. He is my piggy now and I owe him the best life possible and putting him through all that is wrong. So I hope a large cage and two friends and lots of love will be just what he needs.
And to clear up the girls. I have three in a 3x6 with a huge loft. They are very happy and spoiled. The boys will be next to them.
I never wanted two cages but I am dedicated to rescuing pigs and sometimes that means changing your plans.

Triksey
10-24-12, 10:05 pm
hi mufasa... i'm having the same dilemma....don't really want to get patches neutered, right now he's in his own cage across the room from the girls... is that enough? should i maybe try moving him right beside them? i've had them together for floortime with a divider and he REALLY wants to make babies something fierce.... i wasn't sure if moving him closer would wind him up even more? would neutering settle him down or does that just come with age or is it an individual thing? i've read alot on this site but would like a personal opinion.... thanks for any help!

mufasa
10-25-12, 07:54 am
Triksey I asked two vets about keeping Bo and Amy next door to each other because I didn't want to drive him crazy. They said it can, but it depends on the pig. Borat was an extremely laid back pig in general, so other than when Amy was in heat, he wasn't too insane about trying to get to her. They interacted a lot through the grid divider in the playpen, though. I'd just be very, very careful that the way you separate them leaves no way for the boar to get to the sow. A desperate male piggy can get pretty innovative in his methods to get to the "prize."

foggycreekcavy
10-25-12, 09:59 am
Ok thanks everyone. But her is an update. Bernie is quite depressed but tomorrow I am getting two more males and they are getting a large cage for them. I feel neutering just so I don't have two cages is selfish. He is my piggy now and I owe him the best life possible and putting him through all that is wrong. So I hope a large cage and two friends and lots of love will be just what he needs.
And to clear up the girls. I have three in a 3x6 with a huge loft. They are very happy and spoiled. The boys will be next to them.
I never wanted two cages but I am dedicated to rescuing pigs and sometimes that means changing your plans.

Why are you getting two more males? Just one would be enough. I will tell you, though, that having three males next to a cage with females will not work very well, unless all access is blocked (including making sure they can't see each other). Otherwise they will be spending all their time trying to get at the girls and fighting each other.

Honestly, I would do a neuter instead. Neutered male/intact female pairings work really, really well. So much better than trying to get three males to get along.

foggycreekcavy
10-25-12, 10:02 am
hi @mufasa (http://www.guineapigcages.com/forum/member.php?u=22259) ... i'm having the same dilemma....don't really want to get patches neutered, right now he's in his own cage across the room from the girls... is that enough? should i maybe try moving him right beside them? i've had them together for floortime with a divider and he REALLY wants to make babies something fierce.... i wasn't sure if moving him closer would wind him up even more? would neutering settle him down or does that just come with age or is it an individual thing? i've read alot on this site but would like a personal opinion.... thanks for any help!

Are you intending on getting Patches a cage mate? Because keeping him in a cage alone next to a cage with females isn't optimal. I would either neuter him so you can put him with the girls, or get him a male companion and keep them apart from the girls.

I would not put them together for floor time, even with a divider. You're just driving him crazy.

Do you have your own thread on this issue?

foggycreekcavy
10-25-12, 10:08 am
I want to mention that while it may sound better not to neuter, and add more pigs, I've found that going from a possible pair in one cage to two different cages with two different pairs can be overwhelming, and lead to burnout. I've taken in many a pair of guinea pigs from people who didn't want to neuter and instead added cagemates, and found that the added time to care for another cage made having the guinea pigs a chore instead of a pleasure.

Many of us here on this website don't see it this way, but it happens more than you know.

I've had my share of problems with neuters. But with a good exotics vet and appropriate aftercare, I think it's worth it for some situations.

mommykingx3
10-29-12, 07:12 am
Well for over a week now I have had all six pigs. Two bonded males were in need of a new home. Everyone is doing great. The males don't fight at all. They run and play. Still a little squabbling over who's house is who's, but nothing severe. No biting or anything. Bernie seems so much happier. He eats and plays instead of never coming out of his house. I had to put them next to the girls temporarily due to lack a space, and it doesn't seem to matter. The girls have a second level and they sit at the top and watch the new pigs. The boys can't get over there but I have been a little worried about them jumping on top of their house. I never dreamed they would scoot it all the way across the cage. So I actually added my extra grids so there would be no jumping boarders, even though none of them seem interested but it isn't worth the risk of endangering my sows. All my pigs seem very happy and the ones that were in bad health when they came are doing wonderfully. Everyone is getting quite fat. My husband just got laid-off so as soon as he gets another job I will be ordering more cubes so the boys can have an upper level so the can get more exercise. And yes they won't be staying next to the girls forever, we are going to move them, I just wanted them to get settled. They were pretty freaked out.

mommykingx3
10-29-12, 07:53 am
I want to mention that while it may sound better not to neuter, and add more pigs, I've found that going from a possible pair in one cage to two different cages with two different pairs can be overwhelming, and lead to burnout. I've taken in many a pair of guinea pigs from people who didn't want to neuter and instead added cagemates, and found that the added time to care for another cage made having the guinea pigs a chore instead of a pleasure.

Many of us here on this website don't see it this way, but it happens more than you know.

I've had my share of problems with neuters. But with a good exotics vet and appropriate aftercare, I think it's worth it for some situations.

I can see what you mean and I agree to some degree. But me personally, my pigs I adore. And of course I don't enjoy all the extra poop, :D , but I am a bit crazy about my pigs. Knowing my females' personality Bernie would have been picked on terribly and most likely never been accepted. I really didn't want to risk his life with neutering, his life had been terrible enough. The people I got him from lied about his gender, I am almost certain, he was so skinny I don't know how he was still alive. After a month he still acted abused. Although he had tripled in weight.
So after much deliberation and long talks through the night, my husband and I decided what we felt was the right decision for our little Bernie. We knew going into this that there was a possibility that he wouldn't bond with them and I would be stuck with three darn cages but that was a commitment in its self we had to make before we even got the pigs. Then like a sign, I was contacted about these two males. So we went for it. And in one short week the new large cage and two brothers did what we couldn't accomplish in a whole month. He is HAPPY! It is so awesome to see him running around and playing, he even comes out to eat his veggies. He is a totally different pig. I am obsessed with these guys and getting burnt out on them would be like getting burnt out on my three wonderful children, it's not gonna happen. It's like this, nobody enjoys being elbow deep in stinky poop at two in the morning with a screaming baby but we do it any way because we love our children. And before you say it's not the same thing, it is for me. :D
but I can see what had happening to someone else, so good advice.