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Cavy Tamer
04-22-05, 02:19 am
I have been wanting a companion pet for a long time. I had wanted a rabbit, but then thought that perhaps they were too much work. Instead I got a guinea pig, and then decided it needed a friend. They have turned out not to be the companion pet I envisioned. (I know..... what was I thinking....) I mean, they're very cute and its fun to watch them play... but I wanted a little buddy. So, I am now considering getting a rabbit. I interacted with a rabbit at the shelter today, and realized that it is exactly the pet I would have wanted. sigh... Exactly how much work is a rabbit? Is it too much to take care of two guinea pigs and a rabbit? That IS three mouths to feed....

I really want a rabbit.... but maybe its stupid to get one after already getting two cavies.... What do you all think?

*Piglets-Angel*
04-22-05, 02:56 am
If you want a great companion that will play with you, cuddle with you, etc. why dont you consider getting a dog? Thats just my opinion, its your decision. I have 4 guinea pigs, 2 dogs, 1 hamster, and a fish, and I still can take care of more...it just depends really if you think its to much to take care of...it is alot of work to own a rabbit, but Im not an expert at them, so wait for the experts to come.

Rachy1412
04-22-05, 05:31 am
Well it would be safer to get a rabbit than a dog. A dog is much more work than a rabbit, plus a rabbit cannot eat your piggies like a dog can!

A rabbit is much more demanding than a guinea pig. They need double the amount of food, double the space and double the attetion. On the good side they are much more affectionate.(sp?) They do not really like being picked up but they do like a cuddle and grooming.

If you decide to get a rabbit will you be keeping it indoors and litter training it or would you keep it outside? An outside rabbit will need a companion of its own. No matter what sex of rabbit you get you will have to get it neutered/spayed. They are very territorial animals so they will spray and leave droppings every where.

Depending on how much time you have I would say it is not that hard to care for 2 pigs and a rabbit. It will cost more but if you really want a rabbit its worth it! Normally neutered males are more affectionate, but out of my three rabbits it is my female that actually grooms me. It is so sweet!

kimberly78
04-22-05, 07:22 am
I have 2 guinea pigs and a rabbit. My rabbit was born into my home from a foster rabbit I had that the time. While I cant imagine my life without him he is so much work. If you dont have a solid 2 hours to spend with the bunny every day, reconsider. Also they do require yearly check ups which may lead to every 6 months like in my case where my bunny needs his teeth trimmed on a regualr basis. Not all bunnies are cuddlers. You can check out www.rabbit.org (http://www.rabbit.org) for some great care information. Overall rabbits are great animals but as any pet they are what you put into them. I wish you the besy of luck with everything.

bunnyluv17
04-22-05, 01:45 pm
I think one of the hardest things about owning a rabbit (especially when you first start out) is bunnyproofing. Rabbits are intelligent animals and need plenty of mental stimulation in the form of toys, exercise, and attention.

When bunnyproofing, I would start out with only one room and if all goes well after a week or two, you can expand the exercise space. Move all cords and plants out of reach. Don't leave things laying on the floor. Put one or more litterboxes in the room, and add lots of rabbit toys (untreated baskets, tunnels, cardboard boxes with doorways cut out, an old phonebook, a digging box with shredded paper or hay, baked pinecones, untreated apple branches, hard plastic baby toys, plastic slinkies, etc...) If there are any "leaks" in your bunny proofing, rabbits are bound to figure them out.

If you are a neat freak, I would not reccomend a rabbit as a pet. My rabbit is good about peeing in his litter box, but he does leave some droppings around (at least they are easy to pick up). He also scatters some bedding and hay around.

Since you are worried about how much work a rabbit will be, why not contact a local shelter or rabbit rescue and ask to foster a rabbit for a few weeks?

Cavy Tamer
04-22-05, 02:09 pm
I think one of the hardest things about owning a rabbit (especially when you first start out) is bunnyproofing. Rabbits are intelligent animals and need plenty of mental stimulation in the form of toys, exercise, and attention.

When bunnyproofing, I would start out with only one room and if all goes well after a week or two, you can expand the exercise space. Move all cords and plants out of reach. Don't leave things laying on the floor. Put one or more litterboxes in the room, and add lots of rabbit toys (untreated baskets, tunnels, cardboard boxes with doorways cut out, an old phonebook, a digging box with shredded paper or hay, baked pinecones, untreated apple branches, hard plastic baby toys, plastic slinkies, etc...) If there are any "leaks" in your bunny proofing, rabbits are bound to figure them out.

If you are a neat freak, I would not reccomend a rabbit as a pet. My rabbit is good about peeing in his litter box, but he does leave some droppings around (at least they are easy to pick up). He also scatters some bedding and hay around.

Since you are worried about how much work a rabbit will be, why not contact a local shelter or rabbit rescue and ask to foster a rabbit for a few weeks?

Hmm.... Foster a rabbit? That's a really good idea. I didn't know you could do that.