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charliesmommy
03-15-05, 12:45 pm
I recently fell in love with an angora rabbit at my local Humane Society. I'm thinking that I really want to adopt her, and also a friend for her (obviously). I currently have two piggies, and while I'm a little tight on space in my apartment I'd love to take the rabbits in. I've never owned a rabbit, so I need as much info as possible on their care, health, habits, etc... I basically need any info you can give! Also, I've looked at the photos of rabbit cages on here, but if someone could give me some specifics about rabbit cages that would be great. Thanks for all the help! I can't wait for info!

lilliesmomma
03-15-05, 02:18 pm
Rabbits need at least 3hrs of floor time on a daily basis. You need to make sure that your apt is bunny proofed... hide the wires. Building a cage is much better because they will have more room. The cages in the stores are too small.

bunnyluv17
03-15-05, 02:27 pm
Visit www.rabbit.org (http://www.rabbit.org) for the best rabbit care website online. Rabbits need to be spayed/neutered, so if you adopt from the shelter they may do that for you. Finding two rabbits that get along can be tricky, you will have the best luck if you let him/her pick out her own friend. Angora rabbits will require a lot more grooming then the average rabbit so be prepared.

Of course they need unlimited timothy hay and a good quality pellet. If the rabbit is not used to eating vegetables, then introduce them one at a time and slowly. There is a reccomended veggie list at rabbit.org

Rabbits are smart and they love playing with toys, so provide plenty to keep them entertained and stimulated. There is a long list of toy ideas on rabbit.org

Cages should have at least two stories, because rabbits love jumping to the upper levels. It should have a top also to keep them from escaping. Some rabbits will chew on the choroplast, so to be safe put it outside of the cubes.

charliesmommy
03-15-05, 02:51 pm
Thanks for the info so far, that's quite helpful... I should have mentioned that I have a c&c cage for my pigs and see no other option than to build... just some advice on how to build, if they need ramps, etc. I know it should be twice as tall as my piggie cage (aka two grids high) to accomodate them stretching, but other info would be appreciated as well.

bunnyluv17
03-16-05, 01:36 pm
Most rabbits don't need ramps, they can easily jump to the upper levels. I used the cable ties when building my condo instead of the connectors because it makes it more sturdy.

bunnyluv17
03-16-05, 01:37 pm
Here is a site with some rabbit condo ideas : www.morfz.com/nic.html (http://www.morfz.com/nic.html)

Quiet Things
03-16-05, 05:22 pm
Female rabbits dig, well they like to. Thats about the only other info I can add. Oh and if a rabbit gets scared they tap their back legs on the ground. That I learnt from my bunnies, I miss having rabbits. They are very loving if you treat them right. Also they are easier to toilet train the guinea pigs as rabbits are naturally clean creatures and you may find they will designate a part of their cage for toilet activities. Thats what happened with my first rabbit.

Not really that much info to help care for them but hey! Its what I know, well hope I know, if it's wrong then I disown knowing it!

miskaffon
03-16-05, 11:09 pm
I've had rabbits since I was nine years old. One thing I like to warn folks about; most of the rabbits that I have shared my life with have been very sensitive to vegitables. If you want to add some to their diet, but they aren't used to it, as Bunnyluv17 notes, add them VERY slowly to avoid intestinal distress.

Also, their backs are fragile, so if you must make a two level cage, I don't recommend not having a ladder as Bunnyluv17 suggests. They could also hurt their legs from jumping that high; I would add a carpeted/somehow lined ramp for a multi-level cage.

Basically, be aware that the back legs of a rabbit are very strong. They can inflict some incredible scratches when scared; so try to wear long sleeves when you handle them and keep their nails well-clipped.

If you get an Angora, invest in a good grooming brush; the type for wool animals is best. I recommend checking with an allergist to make sure you do not have allergies to the fiber that Angoras grow. I am severely allergic to fiber, only slightly allergic to regular fur found on many animals.

I also would not get a rabbit without spaying/neutering if you're planning on her being an indoor pet. Timothy/grass hay is good, however, if you get a high-quality pellet such as Calf-Manna, Hubbard, or Purina you shouldn't have to feed anything else. Variety is good, though, and I wouldn't want to have just one type of food! Contrary to popular belief, I have yet (in the hundreds of rabbits I've had) found one that likes carrots. They do, however, like many of the same veggies that cavies like. Stay away from fruits, or anything sugary. They might do ok, but would likely get runny stools.

If you have any other questions, feel free to private email or message me. I can find the answer somewhere in my library if I don't know it right off-hand.

miskaffon
03-16-05, 11:11 pm
vegetables? Just how is that spelled, anyway? Geesh, I guess it's getting late....;)

bunnyluv17
03-17-05, 01:36 pm
If you plan to build upper levels beyond the first 14", then it would be best to have a ramp in between the upper levels. I have a dwarf who has absolutely no problem jumping to the first level of his condo; but for safety reasons he has a carpeted ramp from the 2nd to the 3rd story. He also frequently jumps on and off of the couch.

Hay is the most important part of a rabbit's diet, even more important than pellets. Hay helps keep the digestive system moving and prevents blockages and hairballs that can lead to stasis (which can be deadly). I would always have unlimited timothy hay available to the rabbit.

fruits and carrots, like miskaffon said, should be only occasional treats.




Also, their backs are fragile, so if you must make a two level cage, I don't recommend not having a ladder as Bunnyluv17 suggests. They could also hurt their legs from jumping that high; I would add a carpeted/somehow lined ramp for a multi-level cage.

Timothy/grass hay is good, however, if you get a high-quality pellet such as Calf-Manna, Hubbard, or Purina you shouldn't have to feed anything else. Variety is good, though, and I wouldn't want to have just one type of food! Contrary to popular belief, I have yet (in the hundreds of rabbits I've had) found one that likes carrots. They do, however, like many of the same veggies that cavies like. Stay away from fruits, or anything sugary. They might do ok, but would likely get runny stools.

Cailloui
03-18-05, 07:27 pm
Contrary to popular belief, I have yet (in the hundreds of rabbits I've had) found one that likes carrots.

I myself would like to say, my bun bun loves carrots.. Carrots are her favorite treats, but I do reccomend that you limit these because they are high in sugar..

synesthesia
03-19-05, 03:45 pm
I too am getting a rabbit. He is a big boy so he requires a special cage.
How can I go about getting the materials and buidling it cheaply and as strong as possible?
Also, how can I build a door for the rabbit to come and go as he pleases?

dagwellismypigy
03-19-05, 04:03 pm
Do rabbits need friends as much as guinea pigs?

Piglet
03-19-05, 04:27 pm
Synesthesia, make a C&C cage. Look at www.cavycages.com (http://www.cavycages.com/)

synesthesia
03-20-05, 12:16 am
I am trying to figure out how to do that... I found several places that have the cubes, but I am not sure if they will be enough, and I need to find coroplast or a substitute...

bunnyluv17
03-20-05, 07:20 am
I would reccomend using cable ties instead of the connectors when building a C&C cage for rabbits. The cable ties can double as hinges for a door, so you can have a door anywhere you want. I made a double wide door that swings out for the side of my condo, and then I have a door on top to reach my rabbit on the top story.

Instead of a C&C cage you could also use a puppy exercise pen, which would also provide plenty of space for a large rabbit.



I too am getting a rabbit. He is a big boy so he requires a special cage.
How can I go about getting the materials and buidling it cheaply and as strong as possible?
Also, how can I build a door for the rabbit to come and go as he pleases?

synesthesia
03-22-05, 09:06 pm
What cheap, temporary material can I use for a floor?

bunnyluv17
03-23-05, 01:33 pm
Do you have any extra linoleum in your attic? When we first built our rabbit condo, we didn't have a bottom so we used a plastic tarp for a temporary floor.






What cheap, temporary material can I use for a floor?

synesthesia
03-23-05, 03:00 pm
No linoleum, and money is tight right now so I can't even afford to get a piece of cardboad.
I think I will simply, for now, just use some cardboard until I can get something better.
I have my grids now :D

lilliesmomma
03-25-05, 02:33 pm
You could also use some leftover carpeting. I use throw rugs like for the kitchen and bathroom. I get them at the dollar store and wash them when they get dirty. If they dig the nuts out of it and it begins to get ragged I just replace it.

Are you going to be able to afford the food and litter to take care of the bunny?


No linoleum, and money is tight right now so I can't even afford to get a piece of cardboad.
I think I will simply, for now, just use some cardboard until I can get something better.
I have my grids now :D