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Quaestor
04-08-09, 07:16 pm
on this page Pet Store Cages (http://www.guineapigcages.com/petstorecages.htm) there is a dead link to http://www.guineapigcages.com/cagetypes.htm in reference to exposed wood.

Is exposed wood a problem because of of liquid absorbency and possible harmful wood oils? or is there another reason?

Ly&Pigs
04-08-09, 07:49 pm
Mostly because of liquid absorbency. Pee and other liquids can cause bacterial growth that can make pigs sick. Some types of wood like cedar and pine are not recommended because of the aromatic oils. Wood cages are often harder to keep clean than cubes and coroplast cages.

Michellekpf
05-25-09, 09:28 pm
Mostly because of liquid absorbency. Pee and other liquids can cause bacterial growth that can make pigs sick. Some types of wood like cedar and pine are not recommended because of the aromatic oils. Wood cages are often harder to keep clean than cubes and coroplast cages.


What is recommended to seal wood? Latex (water based) paints and polys?

Thank you!

Slave to the Wheek
05-26-09, 12:26 am
Guinea pigs are also prone to eat wood, wood holds moisture content from the bedding, from the veggies, from urine and of course the odd leaking water bottle. Wood rots, molds and draws insects you don't want such as termites and if you use plywood, you'll find that it has epoxies and glues used to make the plywood that will make your pig sick if the wood gets wet or chewed on. Simply put, wood is the last choice for guinea pigs and it's the reason why CC cages have become so popular.

There was a time...decades ago, when building a 'hutch' was popular thing to do for small animals. This was a time when people were far less educated in general on caring for animals. When guinea pigs were rare and exotic creatures that nobody knew how to care for in general. During these years people in general looked to the breeder associations for care. The problem is that those breeders for guinea pigs mainly bred for institutional research.

The information regarding guinea pig care was provided with an eye toward keeping as many pigs in as small of a space and fed the least amount of food and water to survive...NOT to Thrive. For example: guinea pigs kept on wire flooring was not an issue because they killed them within a few months during research. Animals who got sick were simply removed from the research and killed. They used to insist that the life expectancy of a cavy was 3 years. That pretty much tells you how their animals "thrived".

When this site got started just a few years ago, that kind information was still being disseminated via the breeders and repeated from ancient banks of books. I've noticed over the last 3 years even that we are slowly changing peoples perspectives on many of these long held myths created by people looking at guinea pigs as livestock.

Now that knowledge is easily disseminated on the internet by guinea pig owners, rescuers and breeders it's pretty much agreed that wood is the very last resort when designing a guinea pig habitat. There is not a single benefit to choosing wood over a multitude other products, and dozens of reasons not to.

There is nothing that you can do to wood to make it a decent caging option except to completely cover it with coroplast or other sturdy product such as linoleum. Even then, you'll find that if you staple or nail it, that the areas where it's stapled will leak through and rot the wood underneath.

Arizonapiggies
05-26-09, 12:31 am
I would avoid wood altogether as it soaks up all sorts of nasty things, is hard to clean, ends up as dinner, and is heavy and awkward to move. If you try and coat it with anything then your piggie will just eat that too(possibly toxic chemicals). Pretty much any other option is better than wood(other than wire floors)

jenniwat001
05-26-09, 11:10 am
There are some good wood cages on this site, but (all) have a coroplast (or similar) tray insert which prevents the urine soaking in and makes it easy to clean. These cages are usually for aesthetic reasons and not because they are easier or cheaper. A c&c cage is definitely easiest on the hands and wallet!

4piggers
05-26-09, 12:50 pm
Guinea pigs are also prone to eat wood, wood holds moisture content from the bedding, from the veggies, from urine and of course the odd leaking water bottle. Wood rots, molds and draws insects you don't want such as termites and if you use plywood, you'll find that it has epoxies and glues used to make the plywood that will make your pig sick if the wood gets wet or chewed on. Simply put, wood is the last choice for guinea pigs and it's the reason why CC cages have become so popular.

There was a time...decades ago, when building a 'hutch' was popular thing to do for small animals. This was a time when people were far less educated in general on caring for animals. When guinea pigs were rare and exotic creatures that nobody knew how to care for in general. During these years people in general looked to the breeder associations for care. The problem is that those breeders for guinea pigs mainly bred for institutional research.

The information regarding guinea pig care was provided with an eye toward keeping as many pigs in as small of a space and fed the least amount of food and water to survive...NOT to Thrive. For example: guinea pigs kept on wire flooring was not an issue because they killed them within a few months during research. Animals who got sick were simply removed from the research and killed. They used to insist that the life expectancy of a cavy was 3 years. That pretty much tells you how their animals "thrived".

When this site got started just a few years ago, that kind information was still being disseminated via the breeders and repeated from ancient banks of books. I've noticed over the last 3 years even that we are slowly changing peoples perspectives on many of these long held myths created by people looking at guinea pigs as livestock.

Now that knowledge is easily disseminated on the internet by guinea pig owners, rescuers and breeders it's pretty much agreed that wood is the very last resort when designing a guinea pig habitat. There is not a single benefit to choosing wood over a multitude other products, and dozens of reasons not to.

There is nothing that you can do to wood to make it a decent caging option except to completely cover it with coroplast or other sturdy product such as linoleum. Even then, you'll find that if you staple or nail it, that the areas where it's stapled will leak through and rot the wood underneath.


Wouldnt it be more odd to find a NON leaking water bottle? <insert funny sarcasm here>

Other then that...:D the post is 100% right on.