PDA

View Full Version : What do I do about my overweight piggy?



pennykit&amanda
09-08-08, 02:57 pm
my piggy (I've had since June, named Kit) is overweight, although I don't have a scale so I don't know how much she weighs. But, just by looking at her she is really fat, but Kit's daughter (Penny, who lives with her) isn't. They live in a 2x4 c&c cage in my bedroom. I feed them both, everyday, about four leaves of romaine lettuce, a fourth of a cucumber, four carrots (two each), about a fourth of a large apple, two cherry tomatoes, and an unlimited supply of Kaytee timothy hay and pellets. I also let them out in a huge run in my yard for about 2-3 hours, but most of the time she just sits and eats the grass (unlike her daughter who popcorns everywhere). Is there any sort of special hay I should give her, reduce the amount of pellets? What about Penny, would she have to go on a diet too, it also seems like it would be hard to see how much Kit ate, because Penny would eat it. I know what obesity can cause, and I don't want her to die too soon. She is: only about 10-11 months old, loves food, was fat before I got her, is the only obese pet I've had, and my first pig. PS. She is my avatar, but she is bigger now!

rabbitsncavyluv
09-08-08, 03:22 pm
You need to get a scale to weigh them, cut out the apple and switch the pellets to limited Oxbow or Kleenmama. Kaytee isn't that great.

Ly&Pigs
09-08-08, 05:36 pm
Ditto to what RnCL said but I want to add more. Cut the amount of carrots down to 1 baby carrot per pig per day and cut the cucumber down to every 2-3 days and limit it to about 1-2 1/4" slices each. I'd add some other things into their diet as well like cilantro and bell pepper (especially for C intake).

Please see the Nutrition charts sticky thread in this section and the sample menus thread for good diet plans.

Percy's Mom
09-08-08, 07:38 pm
If the pigs are over 6 months old, you will also want to reduce the amount of pellets you give to 1/8-1/4 cup of pellets per pig per day. Pellets for a cavy that is no longer growing at the rate of a youngster or needing extra nutrition like a pregnant or nursing sow can be fattening as well.