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View Full Version : Starting to rethink adopting a bunny



nismosmama
08-27-06, 01:09 am
Ok, so I need bunny owners to be totally honest, how much and how closely do bunnies need to be watched. And do they just destroy everything they see? I'm getting a little worried now. I really would love to adopt a bunny, but after reading all the different websites and FAQ's and info on caring for a bunny, I'm starting to rethink things. I have a lot of electronics in my house, I have a new leather couch, I have bookcases with lots of books including the lower shelf. I have a tiny kitchen and bathroom and only one bedroom. Is having a bunny in a home like this really a good idea? I keep reading about how they chew everything in site, every nook and crany needs to be bunny proofed and you can expect them to bite on your wooden furniture (which is pretty much all my house) and stuff like couches and things not up high. Is this something that I should expect to be prety common :confused:

suzilovespiggie
08-27-06, 07:19 am
My rabbits do no have the run of my house. I have dogs and it would not be safe. I have an extra bathroom that is about 6x6 ( a guess). They have complete run of that, plus the bathtub, I have a big box next to the tub and they jump in an out. In the tub is litter and lots of hay. They have lots of toys, and cardboard boxes to hide and chew on. I have not found them destructive at all. The 2 of them play and keep each other company. They both are also very affectionate to me. I find rabbits a delight. Just like you would keep your piggies safe, you would keep a rabbit safe. (From wires and such) Good luck in decision.

bunnyluv17
08-27-06, 03:29 pm
I have heard of rabbits out there who are extremely destructive, so they do exist. However, my rabbit is hardly destructive at all. He only gets the run of my room since he is not perfect with the litterbox. I have blocked access to all cords and make sure things are picked up off the floor, and I also have provided him with a lot of toys/boxes/tunnels but that's about it. For most rabbits, they become destructive when they are bored. So providing plenty of mental stimulation is key.

In the past, I had one other rabbit who was bonded with my current rabbit. We tried letting them run around in the living room, but it did not work out. They liked to chew on the soft pine furniture, hid under the couch, and chewed on the fabric of the couch that hung down.

If you are unable to block off all of the cords in your house, or block the rabbit's access to the cords, then you should probably not get a rabbit. They will chew cords if they are easily accessible. There are cord protectors out there that can be wrapped around cords.

Do you have a rabbit rescue near you? Perhaps the best thing to do would be to consult with them about the personalities of the rabbits that they have and they may be able to consult or guide you through bunny-proofing.

PurplePoe
08-28-06, 11:05 pm
I have two rabbits and the only problem they've caused is chewing on the power cords. It was my fault really, I was so excited that they were here that I didn't take the time to buy those cord wrap-arounds that you can find at most electronic stores. I must say that they have probably been my greatest bunny-proofing investment.

Also, I too don't allow my rabbits to have full run of the house because of my dogs (one of which has a ridiculous prey-drive that is being dealt with), but when they are out I don't have a lot of trouble with keeping them away from the wood as long as they're kept busy. I often take brown paper bags of different sizes, put handfuls of hay and a few papaya treats in them, and roll them up to keep them doing something "constructive." I've read that spaying/neutering mellows a rabbit out as well, but I have nothing to compare that with since all of my rabbits have always been altered.

Hope this helped.

jam224
09-03-06, 12:19 am
I can't imagine our life without our bunnies! I would definitely reconsider adopting!

As for supervision, yes, bunnies need to be watched if they're not in a bunny-proofed area. (You can found out more about bunny-proofing from rabbit.org.) My husband and I have avoided this by making a playpen for the buns when we let them out for exercise. We made the playpen out of NIC cube grids, 2 high, zip-tied together (much less expensive than manufactured playpens). It folds away easily when playtime is over and is easy enough to set up daily. They don't have access to baseboards, cords, our kitchen furniture, etc. We can trust them because everything we put in the play area is for them and their enjoyment!

Seriously, every bunny is different. Some are attracted to destroying cords and some could care less about chewing up your furniture. Don't let this deter you. Bunnies are capable of showing a lot of affection, they're quiet, and they can be littertrained! Bunnies are the perfect pets for us! :heart:

Yes, I would highly recommend spaying or neutering your bunny. He/She will be so much more happier and healthier for it. I also recommend checking out your local shelters for buns, if you haven't thought of it already. Both of our bunnies were adopted.

Myspoiltpiggies
09-03-06, 05:08 am
OK I'm going to be totally honest with you. We have a leather suite and definately lots of wire hanging around, I've had Riley 5 months and he hasn't ruined a single thing. The only problem I have with him is his constant urge to mount something (but I'm going to solve this by neutering him). It will be better for him (he won't feel constantly sexually frustrated and better for me as I will be able to cuddle him properly). So from my short-ish experience, rabbit don't destroy anything. But of course Riley is just one bunny. The only thing Riley has tried to eat in the house is a candle LOL.

jam224
09-04-06, 11:30 am
OK I'm going to be totally honest with you. We have a leather suite and definately lots of wire hanging around, I've had Riley 5 months and he hasn't ruined a single thing.
Wow, you're so lucky! We play it on the safe side and don't even tempt our buns, LOL!

The only problem I have with him is his constant urge to mount something (but I'm going to solve this by neutering him).
Good luck with the surgery! Males tend to recover better/faster than females, so hopefully your Riley will be back to himself in no time! I hope he reacts like ours did -- he turned into a big softie! :heart:

The only thing Riley has tried to eat in the house is a candle LOL.
Gosh, bunnies sure do have weird tastes, don't they? LOL! lol

ILOVEHONEY2005
10-07-06, 02:00 pm
Every once in a while I bring my outside rabbits, one at a time, inside for a little run around the house. I have 7 rabbits and I never had them chew on anything. I have owned rabbits for 10 years now. They have more fun hopping around the house. But I would imagine if you let them run around your house all day they would be come bored and start to chew on things.....I hoped I helped! Good luck on your decision!

VoodooJoint
10-07-06, 10:37 pm
Every once in a while I bring my outside rabbits, one at a time, inside for a little run around the house. I have 7 rabbits and I never had them chew on anything. I have owned rabbits for 10 years now. They have more fun hopping around the house. Your rabbits have more fun inside yet you keep them outside? Don't you want what's best for them?


But I would imagine if you let them run around your house all day they would be come bored and start to chew on things.....I hoped I helped! Good luck on your decision!Since you banish your rabbits outside and away from you all you are capable of is "imagining". I have house rabbits so I know the joy they are. Like any active, curious animal they get into mischief and need toys to keep them happy. It is easy to rabbit proof a room or two in the house for the rabbits to live in, interact with the family and each other and get all the room they want to run and play. If you want to learn more about house rabbits I recommend you go to House Rabbit Society Rabbit Care Guide (http://rabbit.org) and/or get the House Rabbit Handbook.