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Kori'smom
06-19-06, 09:48 pm
My girls got rabbits for their b-day. I was told you can train them to use a litter pan. So we got one. They are doing really good as far as pee but for the poops they are all over the cage. We keep picking them up and puting them in the litter pan. But they still go all over the cage.

My question is how do I get them to use it for poops also?

Slap Maxwell
06-20-06, 05:59 am
Are both girls spayed? Rabbits HAVE to be spayed. That will help with litterbox habits and also protect against ovarian cancer, which they have a 25% chance of getting as they age.

Rabbits also make VERY bad gifts. I hope that you are commited to the 9-12 years that these rabbits will live, and not dump them on some rescue as they become older.

Kriket
06-20-06, 08:45 am
My girls got rabbits for their b-day. I was told you can train them to use a litter pan. So we got one. They are doing really good as far as pee but for the poops they are all over the cage. We keep picking them up and puting them in the litter pan. But they still go all over the cage.

My question is how do I get them to use it for poops also?

There are several good websites as far as house rabbits go. I think it depends on the age of the bunny, too. I'm pretty sure I read on the house rabbit society webpages that baby rabbits are harder to train, but that it can be done. My Bunny Willow is the same way, she's pretty good about going pee in the litter box (as long as she's IN the cage) but pooping in there is apparently out of the question. I think the website for the house rabbit society is www.rabbit.org (http://www.rabbit.org) but someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Kori'smom
06-20-06, 10:25 am
Are both girls spayed? Rabbits HAVE to be spayed. That will help with litterbox habits and also protect against ovarian cancer, which they have a 25% chance of getting as they age.

Rabbits also make VERY bad gifts. I hope that you are commited to the 9-12 years that these rabbits will live, and not dump them on some rescue as they become older.

We have 3 rabbits. They are all girls and no they are not spayed yet. They are only 8 weeks old. I know my girls will not fully commit to taking full care of them. But Me as and ANIMAL lover will have no problem.

Kori'smom
06-20-06, 10:25 am
There are several good websites as far as house rabbits go. I think it depends on the age of the bunny, too. I'm pretty sure I read on the house rabbit society webpages that baby rabbits are harder to train, but that it can be done. My Bunny Willow is the same way, she's pretty good about going pee in the litter box (as long as she's IN the cage) but pooping in there is apparently out of the question. I think the website for the house rabbit society is www.rabbit.org (http://www.rabbit.org) but someone correct me if I'm wrong.

Thanks I will look at the site

naturestee
06-20-06, 05:50 pm
Sometimes it's hard to littertrain babies, and it's not unusual for the littertraining to go straight out the window once they hit puberty. But starting now will mean that they know the concept after they've been spayed.

Do you have litter all over the cage bottom or just in the litterbox? I've found that having litter only in the litterbox helps them differentiate between where they should and shouldn't be pooping. One of the best things that helps is hay. Put their hay in a rack over the litterbox or piled in it on one side. Supposedly if the hay is on one side of the litterbox, the rabbits will eat the hay and use the other side for their potty. It works for some, but mine just eat the hay, turn around and poop on it, then pout until they get clean hay!lol In any case, rabbits do like to eat and poop at the same time and that's why hay in or above the litterbox helps.

When you clean the litterbox, put a few poops and a small bit of wet litter back in to remind them that the box is the potty. Clean up accidents with plain white vinegar. It works great and removes the smell so they're not getting the "potty here" signal.

Oh, and BTW I don't know where you got your buns from, but be aware that it's not unusual for baby rabbits to be missexed. Even vets and experienced breeders get thrown for a loop sometimes. So keep an eye out for buns with the wrong bits. Puberty can occur as early as 12 weeks and the genitalia should become more obvious.

Kori'smom
06-20-06, 06:39 pm
thank you for your help. To sex them I used a website I found on the internet.

Coopdog
06-20-06, 07:33 pm
My daughter has a male, neutered bunny. He does a wonderful job with his litter pan, even returning to his opened cage to use it when he's hopping about. But he still leaves the occasional pellets here and there. I've never known a rabbit that was 100 % perfect in that department. But at least they're easy to vacuum up!