PDA

View Full Version : Hay storage



LobsterOverlord
05-22-06, 05:54 pm
Ok, I am having a delimma on my bale I bought. I have a place to store it, I have searched the forum for info, but I can't find something on HOW to store it.

I have a shed, and I can also put it in the utility room at the house.

I know to avoid moisture, but how do I do that? Can I store it in containers (with or without holes) and would inside the house be better than out in the shed (this is florida, and it's dry here currently.)

The outter layer has already gone from green to brown in the few days I've had it, so I want to avoid having it do more of this.

John M>

fourbwabbys
05-22-06, 06:13 pm
I store mine in a huge carboard box with holes in my basement. I would put it in the dryest place to avoid mold growth.

Harleigh
05-22-06, 06:36 pm
We just got a large rubbermaid container that will slide under the piggies cage. We are going to leave the top off for air ventilation.

jdomans
05-22-06, 07:48 pm
Don't seal it as it will compost and mold on you. Mine is on our balcony (we are in an apartment) in trash bags that are opened.

LobsterOverlord
05-22-06, 08:21 pm
I have large plastic bins, so that should be fine then? as long as the top is off? (and some circulation around the edges?)

JOhn M.

albert
05-22-06, 09:21 pm
I buy several bales at a time and they are all stored in a shed. The ones that i am using are in large plastic containers or cardboard boxes and covered with a trap. Have never had problems with mould but then the bales dont last that long.

aqh88
05-23-06, 11:34 pm
Well cured hay can be in an airtight container for several days at least. Kind of depends on the weather in your area as well. Over the winter I go ahead and leave most hay I order in the plastic bags in the boxes and some of them I didn't even open the box. The weather was really dry and the hay was dried the correct amount so it didn't mold or rot. In humid weather and in most places during the summer you should avoid keeping the hay in any type of plastic container. A cardboard box works the best for small to moderate amounts of hay because it allows for not only air flow but absorbs some of the moisture or an entire bale can just be left open to the air. Try to set bales up off the ground such as on a table or in sheds/garages wooden pallets work well. Hay on the ground is highly likely to mold even sitting on a dry floor. The moisture from the air can settle around the bale especially if your setting it on uncovered concrete. Even in dry weather we always lose the bales on the bottom of the stack in the stable. Lastly keep hay away from sunlight as best you can. Hay in direct sunlight will turn brown within a day or 2.

Disney Pigs
05-24-06, 08:26 am
Find the driest place possible. I personally have used Rubbermaid type containers and drilled holes in them for air circulation and to try and confine it. Once you open a bale of hay, I always have them explode. This will give you a neat and tidy way to store it while having axcess at all times.

Percy's Mom
05-24-06, 08:36 am
I still need to get a picture of it, but I have the absolute largest Rubbermaid type container I could find, dumped the hay inside, cut out the inside of the lid, replaced that with chicken wire for ventilation, and VOILA coffee table/hay box for the animal room. It's been working remarkably well for me so far.

Disney Pigs
05-24-06, 08:42 am
I have been using local bales lately. I use the rubbermaid since it stacks nicely and can hold alot. I keep my extra in three rubbermaid bins downstairs with holes drilled into them for air circulation. I keep two smaller containers upstairs without holes for what I am currently using and go downstairs to refill the smaller containers as needed. I have three different bins downstairs since I will at times have three different types of hay so I can keep the sorted as well. It works for me, but as we read on, we see everyone has their own system.

Percy's Mom
05-24-06, 08:59 am
It works for me, but as we read on, we see everyone has their own system.Completely true! What's most important is to keep it dry and contained. Hopefully some of these ideas have helped you either to pick one of our methods or helped you to brainstorm something ingenious of your own.

princesspenelop
07-14-06, 11:50 am
I still need to get a picture of it, but I have the absolute largest Rubbermaid type container I could find, dumped the hay inside, cut out the inside of the lid, replaced that with chicken wire for ventilation, and VOILA coffee table/hay box for the animal room. It's been working remarkably well for me so far.

Hi PM, how do you attach the metal chicken wire onto the plastic lid? I'm not very handy with tools (the cage-making instruction on this website looks easy, but my sister insists that I won't cut the coroplast right, so just in case, I bought extra coroplast), so if you have photos or could explain it in a way that I can quote it to the Home Depot people when I'm buying the hardware, that would be great. Thanks.

Sviega
07-14-06, 12:33 pm
Does hay get buggy?

Percy's Mom
07-14-06, 12:34 pm
I used a utility knife to cut out the middle part of the lid, cut the wire panel slightly larger than that and originally used duct tape to hold the wire around the edges to the remaining plastic part of the lid. It worked well for a while, but I found that I was having to retape every so often. I'm reworking the lid now actually and just have the hay in the open Rubbermaid container. I bought some Gorilla Tape the other day, so I think I'll try that next.

TipiDancer
07-14-06, 02:59 pm
I have jsut recently gotten a huge bale of hay from a local farm, and They gave me a garbage bag and filled it, then closed it with a twist tie. Is this okay?

fairysari
07-14-06, 05:08 pm
I bet you could use screws and nuts to hold the mesh to the fleece. Especially if you get the wire mesh with smaller square holes, and get shorts screws with heads bigger than the squares but the screwy part smaller. Sorry I don't know proper hardware terms!

PM, how big of a storage box do you need to fit a bale of hay? I have a large Sterilite brand large plastic tote box I'm thinking of using. It measures 89cm x 52cm x 43cm and says it's 114L. Would that be big enough?

fourbwabbys
07-14-06, 06:47 pm
I found that using a huge cardboard box that our Industrial Mixer came in with holes poked in works great.

spoonyspork
07-14-06, 07:04 pm
I'm still not quite understanding why people seem to have a hard time keeping hay. We just always kept ours in the hayloft or the feed room (barn... outside but covered... in florida.. quite hot and moisty). We only had a bale mold on us once, and that because it'd been the topmost bale in a truckload during a storm.

Of course, this was for horses, so we went through the hay rather quickly. I just always brought a 'flake' home with me every few days for the pigs (this flake lasted them 3-4 days).

I say if it has to be kept low to the ground outside, just make sure it's in a place that's not air-tight, but enclosed enough that creatures can't do their business in it. Inside, just don't seal it up, and it should be fine. If it molds, then I really have no idea. We just never had that problem :)

princesspenelop
07-15-06, 05:27 pm
I bet you could use screws and nuts to hold the mesh to the fleece. Especially if you get the wire mesh with smaller square holes, and get shorts screws with heads bigger than the squares but the screwy part smaller. Sorry I don't know proper hardware terms!

PM, how big of a storage box do you need to fit a bale of hay? I have a large Sterilite brand large plastic tote box I'm thinking of using. It measures 89cm x 52cm x 43cm and says it's 114L. Would that be big enough?

My sister the material engineer also suggested the bolt and screw idea, but then she also added that is IF I know how to use them properly. I think I'll ask them when I go to Home Depot, maybe they'll show me which size to use with chicken wire.

Disney Pigs
07-18-06, 04:15 am
Not for long term storage. The plastic bag will cause it to mold. If you have a large cardboard box, that would work and it's cheap. I use rubbermaid with holes drilled into it.

TipiDancer
07-18-06, 11:53 am
Well, it would be hard to keep it in a cardboard box because, my mom hates the smell, and my brother cant sleep with the stench. I cant leave it on my balcony because it's too moist where I live. I've recently kept it in a garbage bag in my closet, but I want some good oppinions and suggestions. Thank you Disney Pigs for your reply :)

Disney Pigs
07-18-06, 08:24 pm
Rubbermaid storage bins would be a good option for you then. They have large sizes to keep large amounts. Your ultimate goal is to keep it dry and mold free. Keep trying, you'll find something that can please everyone in your family.

C&K
07-18-06, 10:25 pm
Rubbermaid storage bins would be a good option for you then.

I disagree. The hay if it has any moisture at all in it will go bad.

However, it may work if you can keep the lid off and the hay seems very dry.

Why don't you take it outside on a dry day, and bag up into little paper bags, lots of little packets of hay. Then, take one of those huge paper yard waste bags, and put the smaller bags into it. Then keep this in your closet, keeping an eye out for any sign of moisture or rot. You can get little humidity meters and keep one in the closet, that should let you know if the hay is in danger, if the hay causes your closet to become more humid then your room.

After a few days, I would think that the "smell" won't be as noticable becasue the hay won't be constantly getting mixed up.

I find it funny that she does not like the smell, I love the smell of a fresh batch of hay!

Disney Pigs
07-19-06, 04:29 am
C&K, In one of my earlier posts, I said my Rubbermaid bins have holes drilled into them to keep they hay dry. I was responding to TipiDancer for some options to keep her hay. I know you have to keep it dry and any mold at all could be fatal to the animals. I agree I too love the smell of fresh hay. I was just trying to help out TipiDancer with some ideas.

C&K
07-19-06, 07:08 am
C&K, In one of my earlier posts, I said my Rubbermaid bins have holes drilled into them to keep they hay dry. I was responding to TipiDancer for some options to keep her hay. I know you have to keep it dry and any mold at all could be fatal to the animals. I agree I too love the smell of fresh hay. I was just trying to help out TipiDancer with some ideas.


Well, dispite the hours I spend on this site, I did not see your earlier posts, or notice this was a second page. It happens. I am gladyou keep holes in it, but it really depends how moist the hay is to start with, as many bales would probably still mold in this condition if they are at all moist to start with.

It is a good idea, don't get me wrong, but not all bales are created equal! Some would still mold if moisture only had a couple holes to escape from! I like PM's chicken wire top, that sounds pretty neat!

TipiDancer
07-20-06, 01:42 pm
Why don't you take it outside on a dry day, and bag up into little paper bags, lots of little packets of hay. Then, take one of those huge paper yard waste bags, and put the smaller bags into it.
Fantastic Idea! I will be going to the grocery store in a few minutes to get atleast 50 paper bags. But I don't know where I could find a paper waste bag.

You can get little humidity meters and keep one in the closet.
Already done :)

I find it funny that she does not like the smell, I love the smell of a fresh batch of hay!
Yeah, well she can smell the faintest of smells. So I can see why she doesn't like the strong scent of fresh Timothy.

I like PM's chicken wire top, that sounds pretty neat!
Wow, this idea is great!

HarrysDad
07-26-06, 10:56 pm
Here we have a wheeled trash bin that I store Harrys hay in. My groceries and Hay are the only things that have ever been in it. I keep the lid off and the hay seems to get plenty of air.

Ly&Pigs
07-27-06, 01:27 am
I store hay in one of two ways. KM's hay is stored in the boxes it came in but I removed the plastic bags and it's been fine since. I got the hay in late December.

When I buy bales of bermuda locally, I break the bale down in 4 large flakes and each flake fits in a medium sized sterlite container. I leave the lids off and store them in my utility room usually stacked one on top of the other and a bale lasts about 6-8 months. I have never had any problem with the hay going moldy using this method and I have had bales that were a bit moister than others.

It's what works best for each individual and it does have to do with the moisture content in hay too but even moist hay stored properly and allowed to breath will not mold.