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Lewis3265
11-29-14, 12:01 pm
This makes me sick!

http://imgick.oregonlive.com/home/olive-media/width620/img/pets_impact/photo/16306573-mmmain.jpg
One of the guinea pigs found abandoned in Beaverton meets caretaker Kate Brownlie's pet, Ursula. (Kate Brownlie)

Print (http://blog.oregonlive.com/pets_impact/print.html?entry=/2014/11/guinea_pigs_found_abandoned_in.html)
http://imgick.oregonlive.com/home/olive-media/width40/img/avatars/9286412.png (http://connect.oregonlive.com/user/msbalas/index.html) By Monique Balas | Special to The Oregonian (http://connect.oregonlive.com/user/msbalas/posts.html)
Email the author | Follow on Twitter (https://twitter.com/pettalkoregon)
on November 10, 2014 at 1:45 PM, updated November 13, 2014 at 1:18 PM

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The people caring for a group of guinea pigs recently found abandoned in a Beaverton drainage ditch (http://www.oregonlive.com/aloha/index.ssf/2014/11/aloha_woman_accused_of_dumping.html) say the animals are healthy and should be available for adoption soon.
Aloha resident Cecilia Diaz was arrested last week on charges of first-degree animal neglect and animal abandonment, The Oregonian's Rebecca Woolington reports.
Kate Brownlie, a receptionist at Southwest Animal Hospital (http://www.swanimalhospital.net/index.php) and a longtime guinea pig owner, and a friend of hers are caring for some of the cavies, and the rest are being fostered.
The guinea pigs were easily identifiable when they were found because they're all a particular breed, known as Teddies (http://guinea-pig-haven.webs.com/breeds.htm), which have a frizzy, sheep-like coat.
They were traced by ear tags to a breeder in California who sold them to someone in Oregon who was no longer able to care for them, Brownlie says. That person, in turn, sold them to Diaz
About nine of the nearly 50 animals found have died and some of them have wounds, but the remaining animals appear to be in good condition and are friendly to humans.
"These guys all have really clean ears and other than mud, they're clean-looking," Brownlie says. "They all have good body weight. They're healthy-looking guinea pigs."
http://media.oregonlive.com/pets_impact/photo/16306916-large.jpg (http://media.oregonlive.com/pets_impact/photo/guinea-pig-pic-1jpg-a9a60dca65bad5be.jpg)Kate Brownlie
About 30 total guinea pigs will be available for adoption when they are ready.
Some of the males are being treated for fight wounds by Dr. Melinda Surrency of Hillsboro Veterinary Clinic (http://www.hillsborovet.com/), and the 22 females must be spayed.
To donate to the guinea pig spay fund, call Southwest Animal Hospital at 503-643-2137; cash, checks and credit cards are accepted.
You can also help by donating supplies. The clinic needs aspen shavings (no pine or cedar), large puppy wee pads, Oxbow guinea pig food (http://www.oxbowanimalhealth.com/products/type/detail?object=1582), pigloos, 32-oz. water bottles and large bath towels. If you plan to donate food, call the clinic first.
A few of the females are in the process of being spayed now and will be ready for adoption once they recover from the spay surgery.
You can see pictures of guinea pigs as they become available and apply to adopt one at baselinechurchpigs.com (http://baselinechurchpigs.com/). In the meantime, you can e-mail Brownlie with any questions at [email protected]



http://www.oregonlive.com/pets/index.ssf/2014/11/guinea_pigs_found_abandoned_in.html

aqh88
11-29-14, 12:22 pm
I haven't seen it on that level but I've gained a few guinea pigs left places like next to dumpsters in the past.

AmberCalzone
11-29-14, 12:25 pm
That's so sad :( I'm glad most of them are doing alright!

I am curious why the rescue is spaying the females though? That's a pretty risky procedure. If they wanted to 'fix' on of the sexes, you would think it would be easier to fix the males.

Rywen
11-29-14, 12:32 pm
I hope there's a special level of hell or negative karma or something for people who abandon animals. I adopted Penny from MGPR (mgpr.org), someone had left her in a box in Washington DC in January, she was a pup under 1 month old. I'm so glad she was found and turned in to the guinea pig rescue (Ferb is happy too)! Here's Penny today:

70741

Lewis3265
11-29-14, 12:37 pm
I went to the vet in Beaverton where they were keeping the guinea pigs and bought them a 25lb bag of pellets, and 5lb bag of Timothy hay. They let me see the piggies. They looked fine but, the room was dark.

LoveMyHerd
11-29-14, 12:41 pm
Thanks for being so generous, Lewis3265!

aqh88
11-29-14, 02:58 pm
A lot of rescues/shelters now have a policy of only taking in altered animals of any species. A local one offered to do a courtesy listing on their site of some rabbits I was finding homes for but even to just put it on their page the rabbits had to be spayed.

caroline89
12-02-14, 03:07 am
It looks cute and pity!

EllaBellaMuffin
12-02-14, 07:45 am
That's so sad :( I'm glad most of them are doing alright!

I am curious why the rescue is spaying the females though? That's a pretty risky procedure. If they wanted to 'fix' on of the sexes, you would think it would be easier to fix the males.

Guinea pig female spaying is highly recommended by exotic vets because many of them develop cysts and cancer and can be very costly afterwards than just spaying. Procedure is only risky if guinea pigs has other illness that vet was not aware of. Best time to spay a female is under 6 moths but done successfully later years.

bpatters
12-02-14, 08:21 am
I'm not so sure about that, EllaBellaMuffin. Not all exotic vets recommend spaying females. While many sows do develop cysts, far fewer of them get cancer, and the treatment for either is usually just spaying, so the cost is about the same. All surgeries are risky with guinea pigs, and a spay is a very invasive surgery. The intestines have to be manipulated to get them out of the way, and with some pigs, it's very difficult to get the gut working normally after the surgery.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for ovarian cysts, but having it done shouldn't be a casual decision, and the risks should definitely be considered.

bpatters
12-02-14, 08:21 am
I'm not so sure about that, EllaBellaMuffin. Not all exotic vets recommend spaying females. While many sows do develop cysts, far fewer of them get cancer, and the treatment for either is usually just spaying, so the cost is about the same. All surgeries are risky with guinea pigs, and a spay is a very invasive surgery. The intestines have to be manipulated to get them out of the way, and with some pigs, it's very difficult to get the gut working normally after the surgery.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for ovarian cysts, but having it done shouldn't be a casual decision, and the risks should definitely be considered.

EllaBellaMuffin
12-02-14, 08:34 am
I'm not so sure about that, @EllaBellaMuffin (http://www.guineapigcages.com/forum/member.php?u=26829). Not all exotic vets recommend spaying females. While many sows do develop cysts, far fewer of them get cancer, and the treatment for either is usually just spaying, so the cost is about the same. All surgeries are risky with guinea pigs, and a spay is a very invasive surgery. The intestines have to be manipulated to get them out of the way, and with some pigs, it's very difficult to get the gut working normally after the surgery.

Surgery is the treatment of choice for ovarian cysts, but having it done shouldn't be a casual decision, and the risks should definitely be considered.

Any surgery can be risky and its def not something you decide casually. I was just saying what my vet said.

Fay
12-02-14, 08:58 am
Poor pigs :( hope they all find a good forever home.