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lost_lover
06-15-14, 12:42 am
Odd question I suppose. I am working out how I want to make the pillowcase type uhaul flipper covers I was talking about in another thread. Since I would be investing a decent amount of time into making everything I figured a little extra time to make things last longer would be worth it.

I want to I encase the uhaul pillowcase in a fabric other than the fleece to make them last longer in the wash, with my full cage pillow case liner the stitching tearing through the pads is an issue. I was thinking just thin jersey style cotton would pretty much just let liquids go through it so quickly it was like it was not there. Getting it in white might also help me know where could use some extra spot cleaning. I am just worried it might hold the liquid though instead of letting it get a easily away from the fleece.

Any ideas or opinions on this?

Red5Iam
06-15-14, 12:47 am
I would say try to get some sample swatches or something from a fabric store, or just scrap pieces, and do some quick tests? That way you can see how long materials take to let liquids pass through. I imagine that most cotton fabrics would let liquid pass through pretty quickly. But I've never played with fabrics for that purpose so I'm not sure?

Inle_Rabbit
06-15-14, 02:54 am
No. Pretty much any fabric outside of fleece will create threads that could cause considerable damage to a guinea pig if ingested. You are also right to worry about wetness. Cotton will not dry like fleece does. It will stay wet.

What exactly happened with your stitching? It sounds like something was not set up right there. Either the type of stitch was wrong, wrong type of thread, or maybe not enough seam allowance.

lost_lover
06-15-14, 05:33 am
No. Pretty much any fabric outside of fleece will create threads that could cause considerable damage to a guinea pig if ingested. You are also right to worry about wetness. Cotton will not dry like fleece does. It will stay wet.

What exactly happened with your stitching? It sounds like something was not set up right there. Either the type of stitch was wrong, wrong type of thread, or maybe not enough seam allowance.


No. Pretty much any fabric outside of fleece will create threads that could cause considerable damage to a guinea pig if ingested. You are also right to worry about wetness. Cotton will not dry like fleece does. It will stay wet.


What exactly happened with your stitching? It sounds like something was not set up right there. Either the type of stitch was wrong, wrong type of thread, or maybe not enough seam allowance.


There would be fleece as the top layer that would be all the guinea pigs could be able to touch or access in any way. No strands of thread for them to chew.


The issue I had was that when you sew together two layers of uhaul and then fleece you must turn the case inside out to get it fully dry and inside out ever couple washes to get it fully clean. When I wash the cases inside out, since the uhaul is not a woven fiber, the thread starts to pull toward the edge and eventually all of the way through the seam allowance.


I am hoping for longer lasting results and more thorough cleaning by making the layers as a separate cases , because as flippers the piggies could not get between the layers . I feel if I a make a case out of just uhaul , nothing covering it at all, the stitching will pull through the fabric much more quickly causing me to need to re -sew or just remake more often. I am hoping if I take a very light but woven fabric such as a jersey cotton and put it over the uhaul it will slow down the process of the thread pulling through. A thin fabric like that would also not be much of a barrier in the wash, and I am hoping not much of a barrier between the fleece and the padding for urine since both would be cotton. The fleece would be its own case. Although also not a woven fabric it seems to have considerably less of an issue, likely because the uhaul is not designed to be sewn.


I would think the issue I have is the reason that the uhaul is sold to be wrapped around in the store. While it would take much more time to make all the cases I think it will make the assembly faster, which would be nice.


Hopefully I explained the plan better this time, although last time I wrote it late at night and this time I am writing it when I first woke up.

lissie
06-15-14, 05:48 am
A lot of people just sew one layer of uhaul between fleece, and just put extra layer of unsewn uhaul under the liner if needed. Would that work for you? It would be more like a liner for the whole cage rather than multiple flippers.

lost_lover
06-15-14, 06:21 am
I am wanting to switch from a full-page liner to the flippers for vacuuming. When I picked out my utility vacuum I got one that was very strong so that I could use it for other messes around the house. It is really great but it is 4HP so it sucks the liner right up unless I am holding it down.

it is looking like test swatches are the way to go. It just seems like almost everything has been tried on this forum, and I was just hoping to save myself the time.

pigger123
06-15-14, 07:16 am
So you're trying to make separate absorbent pads, the same size as the coroplast insert, instead of the wrapped-around Uhaul? And you're wanting to sew jersey cotton around uhaul for that? Just trying to clarify. :) It would probably work fine, but I don't see a problem with the way the ones in the store are designed. They don't take very long to assemble, and I would think having separate pad inserts would actually make it take longer and be more difficult to assemble, since it would be hard to get them to all line up.

spy9doc
06-15-14, 07:49 am
I understand that you are trying to be creative and have something that works for you? However, if I get the picture, you are trying to "reinvent the wheel".:ohmy:

If you are having difficulties with the seams unraveling on the fleece, then something is wrong.......poor quality fleece, poor thread, incorrect tension on the machine, or the seam allowance is not wide enough. I have sewn liners that are almost three years old and are just beginning to show signs of wear. The fleece isn't wearing, but I can tell that the uHaul pad in the middle is disintegrating because the liners occasionally leak to the pad underneath. Fleece flippers sound like a good idea in theory, but they just are not for me.

Don't even think of light colored fleece! Every bit of urine and feces will show and you will find yourself changing the cage more often than is really necessary. And, yes, even a lightweight vacuum will pull up fleece that is just laid over a pad. I don't expect everyone to like or implement my setup, but it certainly works very well for me. Let me explain.

I have two cavies (neutered boar and sow) in a 2x5 with a 2x2 loft. They are somewhat litterbox trained, so that reduces the mess on the fleece. My liners are sewn to fit the dimensions of the cage, both main level and loft, and are two layers of fleece with a layer of uHaul between. The liners are sewn and top-sewn around the outside, and there is no issue with burrowing, chewing, or the vacuum pulling it up. Under the liners, I have either puppy pads or incontinence pads. I began using incontinence pads about a year ago and altered them to fit the cage. They are washed and bleached with each cage change and seem to be pretty durable. Neither the liners nor the pads take long to dry. There is nothing difficult about using one-piece liners! When sewing liners, there are always scrap pieces left, and these are sewn into "area rugs" (pads) that can be changed more frequently than the liner.

Consider sticking with the "system" that most of the experienced owners have developed over the years. I applaud creativity, but in this case I think you will be disappointed and and/or frustrated with the results. Of course, we're open to new ideas. :cool:

Inle_Rabbit
06-15-14, 08:00 am
What seam allowance are you using? I have pads that are 2+ years old that have not had that issue.

lost_lover
06-15-14, 11:01 am
I think I am explaining this as way more confusing than it is, so I am getting of the iPhone and on the computer where I can type more clearly. lol

I have full cage liners I made off from this pattern http://www.guineapigcages.com/forum/threads/95478-TUTORIAL-Invertible-amp-Stuffable-Pillowcase-Pad-with-fold-over-flaps?highlight=double+layer+pillowcase I had some issue with the seam allowance as you can see from my post there but that is pretty much worked out. I had previously been using a 5/8 inch because that was where the machine's guide line was.

Because the end result is so thick you turn them inside out halfway through drying so that they get fully dry. I noticed that every few washes I also need to wash then inside out to get all of the odor out. When they are turned inside out is when I had the uhaul padding separate in the wash, it was only in some areas and the fleece stayed firming in place so I am actually still using them.

Now comes in that I got a new shopvac style vacuum. I figured if I was only to spend money on a vacuum for the guinea pigs I might has well get one strong enough to do all of the more 'gross' cleaning around the house. Because I am now using this somewhat powerful vacuum switching to flippers now makes sense to me.

I am planning on ordering the coroplast inserts from the shop but sewing my own covers because the price is just to steep for me and I like having more fleece pattern options. This is where I change something, not a big change. Instead of cutting a long piece of uhaul and wrapping it around the coroplast I want to sew the uhaul into a case just like the fleece. Because the flippers are designed to have two layers on uhaul on each side in addition to the fleece that would just be to thick to make as one piece, at least if I sew it with a machine.

I would be taking the uhaul and making cases like the fleece. Because I have had the issue of the thread pulling threw in the wash I am concerned that I will sew all of these little cases and in 2-3 washes they are going to all start coming undone. I was asking about the cotton because I thought since the fleece encased uhaul lasts for people for so long that maybe I could use some type of thin woven fabric to 'protect' the uhaul. That is why I want a fabric that would do nothing at all, because its only purpose would be for when the pads are being washed.

Maybe I should just stick with wrapping the uhaul around the inserts but I figured a case would just be simple.

spy9doc
06-15-14, 11:53 am
Because the end result is so thick you turn them inside out halfway through drying so that they get fully dry. I noticed that every few washes I also need to wash then inside out to get all of the odor out. ...... Instead of cutting a long piece of uhaul and wrapping it around the coroplast I want to sew the uhaul into a case just like the fleece. Because the flippers are designed to have two layers on uhaul on each side in addition to the fleece that would just be to thick to make as one piece, at least if I sew it with a machine.

I think this part of your explanation is what is confusing to a couple of us. Are you talking specifically about flippers? If so, I will bow out of the discussion because as I mentioned previously, I don't care for them, don't plan to use them, and therefore..........admittedly know little about them. My system works so well for me that I'm not even tempted to change.

pigger123
06-15-14, 12:31 pm
I honestly think it would make everything easier to make flippers the way there're made in the store. If the store sells them, they must work, right? That way you don't have to worry about sewing uhaul at all.

spy9doc
06-15-14, 01:58 pm
Any ideas or opinions on this?

OK........read Traysea's fleece tutorial and have a much better idea what you are talking about. She makes her liners much the same as I, except that I only use one layer of uHaul and have no problems with them retaining odor or drying slowly. Also, mine are completely sewn which keeps the uHaul pad intact for much longer. Still, it IS another way to make liners. I just prefer to "finish" mine.

Inle_Rabbit
06-15-14, 04:29 pm
I have not been a fan of two layers of uhaul. It makes things so much heavier and the dry time longer. I like one layer. That said I have several different ways of going about the cage cleaning. I have some pads that are sewn together fleece/uhaul/fleece, others that are jut fleece/uhaul and then I have others that are just fleece and uhaul cut to size and free. I do notice that the free uhaul tends to denigrate but it lasts for a good long while. At least a year+.

I am going to guess if you're having problems with the stitching coming undone or the uhaul pulling away from the stitching that something is wrong with the stitching. Either the tension isn't right, the thread isn't right, the stitch is too small or the wrong type or your seam allowance is too narrow. Could you post a picture of what you are talking about so we could try and solve this?

lost_lover
06-17-14, 03:58 pm
I have noticed I really do not need that second layer of uhaul, however the coroplast for the flippers sold in the store is cut so that it will fit your cage with two layers. I wouldn't want the gaps between the flippers any bigger than they need to be so two layers (one each side) it is.

The problem might be solvable with a thicker thread at a
lower tension. I am getting the machine I will be using for free from a friend so that might not be an issue to adjust. I had previously been going to my mom's and using her machine. That machine is one of the old green singers and that model is very tricky to make adjustments with. I am sure this machine will not be an antique lol so I can actually see how different tensions hold up.